‘Dark day for students’: School board passes curriculum calling girls a ‘person with a vulva’

“This is a dark day for Wisconsin students, who will be taught a curriculum that reduces them down to their body parts,” Alexandra Schweitzer, president of No Left Turn In Education – Wisconsin, told the Daily Caller News Foundation. “No teacher should refer to their female students as ‘students who will menstruate’ or to their male students as ‘penis owners.’ This is a wholly inappropriate use of classroom time that ought to be spent on educational fundamentals.”

Parents were sent a letter from the school district detailing the curriculum on Aug. 3. The district community had until Aug. 17 to provide feedback on the curriculum to the school board through a Google form.

The sixth grade lesson plan tells teachers to call women “a person with a vulva.” The students are taught how their family and peers may influence their “attitude” towards gender identity and gender expression.

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Candidate who railed against ‘dark money’ shown to be funded by ‘dark money’

A Democratic Wisconsin Senate candidate who has railed against “dark money” in politics is being supported by a left-wing dark money network, Federal Election Commission (FEC) records show.

Mandela Barnes, whose top Senate primary opponents dropped out of the race in July, said in February “Dark money has no place in democracy” and pledges on his website “to stand up to the corrupting influence of dark money.” At the same time, Barnes was endorsed Monday by the Family Friendly Action PAC — which is dumping millions in his race to unseat Republican Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson and is largely funded by the dark money groups Sixteen Thirty Fund and America Votes, according to FEC filings.

Nonprofits with 501(c)(4) IRS exempt status are often referred to as “dark money” groups because they are under no legal obligation to disclose donors and can funnel unlimited sums to super PACs, according to OpenSecrets. Super PACs have to disclose their donors but can be “effectively dark money groups when the bulk of their funding cannot be traced back to the original donor,” according to OpenSecrets.

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Woman committed over Slender Man stabbing seeks her release

The second of two Wisconsin women who were sent to a state mental health facility after a 2014 stabbing attack on a sixth-grade classmate that they claimed was to appease the horror character Slender Man is petitioning for her release.

Morgan Geyser, 20, asked Waukesha County Judge Michael Bohren on June 14 to order her release as he did last year for her co-defendant, Anissa Weier, who spent nearly four years at a mental health facility in Oshkosh.

During a hearing Thursday, Bohren appointed three doctors to evaluate Geyser’s mental state and to submit their reports by Aug. 26. Prosecutors and defense attorneys will return to court on Sept. 12 to schedule another hearing to review the reports.

According to prosecutors, Geyser and Weier lured Payton Leutner to a Waukesha park following a sleepover in May 2014, and Geyser repeatedly stabbed Leutner while Weier urged her on. All three girls were 12 at the time.

Geyser and Weier left Leutner for dead, but she managed to crawl out of the woods in the park and was discovered by a passing bicyclist.

She suffered 19 stab wounds and barely survived, according to medical staff who treated her. Police found Weier and Geyser later that day walking on Interstate 94 in Waukesha. They said they were traveling to Slender Man’s mansion in northern Wisconsin and attacked Leutner because they thought it would make them Slender Man’s servants and prevent him from killing their families.

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Former Judge Killed in ‘Targeted’ Attack Against Judicial System, Officials Say

A retired judge was shot and killed at his home in Wisconsin on Friday in what has been described by officials as a “targeted” attack against the judicial system.

John Roemer, a former circuit judge in Juneau County, is believed to be the victim of the murder that happened in New Lisbon at around 6:30 a.m. on June 3, according to reports. The 68-year-old man was found in a residence that a neighbor and public records said belonged to a retired county judge.

A second person, identified as a 56-year-old male and the alleged suspect, was discovered in the basement of the home with an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, Wisconsin Attorney General Josh Kaul said during a news conference on Friday, also noting that a firearm was recovered from the scene.

Upon recovering the man, law enforcement started life-saving measures and the individual has been transported to a medical facility in critical condition.

Kaul, who refused to name the victim or the suspect, said the shooter had selected targets who were “part of the judicial system” and had other planned victims. The attorney general did not identify them.

“This incident appears to be a targeted act … and the suspect appears to have had other targets as well. It appears to be related to the judicial system,” Kaul said.

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Democrat tax scofflaw tells billionaires: ‘Pay your taxes’

A Wisconsin Democrat who ostentatiously told billionaires this week to “Pay your taxes” turns out to be a tax scofflaw, according to a report from the Washington Free Beacon.

The report identified the Democratic Senate candidate who lectured the ultrawealthy on social media this week and who has “a history of tax delinquency” as Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes.

He reportedly is a frontrunner in the primary for the Democratic Senate nomination, the report said.

But he “failed to pay his property taxes or file tax returns while running for office in 2018,” the report said. And then he “defended himself at the time by claiming that ‘most people’ don’t fully pay their taxes.”

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Milwaukee County Children’s Court Judge Brett Blomme charged with 7 counts of child pornography

A Milwaukee County Children’s Court judge was charged Wednesday with seven counts of possessing child pornography that showed the abuse of young boys.

Brett Blomme, 38, was arrested Tuesday and spent the night at the Dane County Jail. He made his initial appearance in Dane County on Wednesday afternoon, where a court commissioner set a signature bond, with the conditions Blomme not use social media or file sharing services, or have unsupervised contact with children, except for his own. By 4 p.m. he had been released.

Each of the counts carries a minimum mandatory sentence of three years and as much as 15 years in prison plus 10 years of supervised release.

The criminal complaint charges that Blomme uploaded as many as 27 images and videos of children being sexually abused last fall, using the messaging app Kik. The uploads charged in the complaint occurred from a home he and his husband own in Cottage Grove, in Dane County. 

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Wisconsin Special Counsel Finds ‘Widespread Election Fraud’ In 2020 Nursing Homes

“Rampant fraud and abuse occurred statewide at Wisconsin’s nursing homes and other residential care facilities,” according to the Office of Special Counsel’s second interim report filed on March 1 with the Wisconsin Assembly. That conclusion represents but one of the key findings of election irregularities detailed in the nearly 150-page report—a report that also confirms the conclusion of the Racine County Sheriff’s office last fall that fraud occurred at nursing homes in Wisconsin.

Special Counsel Michael Gableman, the retired state Supreme Court justice appointed by the Wisconsin Assembly to investigate integrity concerns about the 2020 election, vetted more than 90 nursing homes in five different counties before concluding there was “widespread election fraud at Wisconsin nursing homes in November of 2020.”

According to the report, nursing home staff and administrators illegally handled absentee ballots, illegally assisted with “marking” residents’ ballots, illegally “witnessed” the voting, and possibly included forgery of the elderly residents’ signatures. Under Wisconsin law, these violations of the election code constitute fraud.

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Wisconsin Elections Commission proceeds with absentee rule

The Wisconsin Elections Commission is moving ahead with enacting a rule that will make clear that local election officials can fill in missing information on absentee ballot envelopes submitted by voters.

The bipartisan commission voted 4-2 on Monday to use its existing guidance on correcting absentee ballot envelopes when drafting an emergency rule spelling out what is allowed for clerks.

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Former New York Times journalist says the paper deliberately HELD her story condemning Kenosha rioters until after 2020 election: ‘The reality of what brought Kyle Rittenhouse into the streets was one we were meant to ignore’

A former New York Times journalist has claimed the paper deliberately held a story about how Kenosha rioters destroyed local businesses until after the 2020 election.  

Nellie Bowles is the partner of Bari Weiss, a fellow disillusioned former New York Times columnist who says she was bullied out of the newspaper because she didn’t align entirely with its views. 

Writing for Weiss’s Substack channel Common Sense, Bowles revealed on Friday that after the August 2020 riots, she went to Kenosha to speak to the owners of small local businesses that had been razed between August 23 and August 28, after Jacob Blake‘s shooting. 

She found in her reporting that the rioters were indiscriminate in who they targeted, often going after businesses and properties in the poorer parts of town. She focused on the fact that those smaller business owners had a harder time claiming back portions of their money from insurance, and that the riots left them down and out. 

She submitted the story but was told ‘The Times wouldn’t be able to run my Kenosha insurance debacle piece until after the 2020 election.’

‘There were a variety of reasons given—space, timing, tweaks here or there. Eventually the election passed. Biden was in the White House. And my Kenosha story ran,’ she wrote.

It ended up not running until November 9, almost a week after the election and nearly four months after the Kenosha riots.

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