‘We Were Creating A Story — Our Focus Was To Get Trump Out’: CNN Director Busted By Undercover Veritas Operative

A technical director for CNN made the grave error of sitting down with a (probably hot) undercover female journalist from Project Veritas, to whom he admitted that the network “got Trump out” with their coverage, and that he “100% believe(s) that if it wasn’t for CNN, I don’t know that Trump would have got voted out.”

“I came to CNN because I wanted to be part of that,” added the director, Charlie Chester.

He then explained how the network engaged in propaganda to ‘create a story’ about Trump vs. Biden.

“[Trump’s] hand was shaking or whatever, I think. We brought in so many medical people to tell a story that was all speculation — that he was neurologically damaged, and he was losing it. He’s unfit to — you know, whatever. We were creating a story there that we didn’t know anything about. That’s what — I think that’s propaganda,” he said, adding “We would always show shots of him [Biden] jogging and that [he’s] healthy, you know, and him in aviator shades. Like you paint him as a young geriatric.”

Keep reading

Propaganda: The Covid-19 vaccine script that TV shows are using to fight fear and misinformation

As doctors and health professionals race against Covid-19 vaccination skepticism, some Hollywood producers, writers and showrunners are betting that inputting vaccines into television storylines can help curb widespread misinformation. 

Shows across TV networks began integrating Covid-19 into scripts, including questions about social distancing and masking, as the pandemic spread across the U.S. last March. Now, as vaccination efforts ramp up nationwide, shows like “This Is Us” — which featured a recurring character receive two doses of a vaccine in an episode last month — are integrating vaccines into episodes and audiences can expect to see more vaccination plot points, says Kate Folb, director of the Hollywood, Health and Society program at the University of Southern California.

Folb is a member of a growing network of entertainment industry experts working closely with writers and showrunners to accurately depict health and medical information, and use entertainment to fight the misinformation campaigns and nationwide skepticism fueled by social media.

Keep reading

Feds Plan To Broadcast Government Propaganda To Streaming Platforms

NextGov recently reported that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) wants to have the ability to interrupt streaming platforms like YouTube, Hulu, Netflix, Spotify and Pandora so they can broadcast “government safety alerts.”

“Per the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the FCC is investigating redefining parts of the national Emergency Alert System, or EAS, and Wireless Emergency Alert System, or WEAS, including developing alerting requirements for online streaming platforms.”

An emergency 9/11 Act has been transformed into a 2021 privacy destroying act. The Feds want the public’s opinion on what they think about allowing government agents access to what Americans are watching on streaming services.

“The commission issued a notice of inquiry this month and will publish an official request for public comment Tuesday in the Federal Register to determine “whether it would be technically feasible for streaming services to complete each step that EAS participants complete under the commission’s rules in ensuring the end-to-end transmission of EAS alerts, including monitoring for relevant EAS alerts, receiving and processing EAS alerts, retransmitting EAS alerts, presenting EAS alerts in an accessible manner to relevant consumers, and testing,” according to the notice of inquiry.”

Keep reading

Modern art was CIA ‘weapon’

For decades in art circles it was either a rumour or a joke, but now it is confirmed as a fact. The Central Intelligence Agency used American modern art – including the works of such artists as Jackson Pollock, Robert Motherwell, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko – as a weapon in the Cold War. In the manner of a Renaissance prince – except that it acted secretly – the CIA fostered and promoted American Abstract Expressionist painting around the world for more than 20 years.

The connection is improbable. This was a period, in the 1950s and 1960s, when the great majority of Americans disliked or even despised modern art – President Truman summed up the popular view when he said: “If that’s art, then I’m a Hottentot.” As for the artists themselves, many were ex- communists barely acceptable in the America of the McCarthyite era, and certainly not the sort of people normally likely to receive US government backing.

Why did the CIA support them? Because in the propaganda war with the Soviet Union, this new artistic movement could be held up as proof of the creativity, the intellectual freedom, and the cultural power of the US. Russian art, strapped into the communist ideological straitjacket, could not compete.

Keep reading