Why Society Needs Conspiracy Theories & Conspiracy Theorists

It seems like you can’t catch a news headline or social media post these days without coming across the terms conspiracy theory and conspiracy theorist, or phrases like ‘spreading conspiracies’. One has to wonder: why are they so frequently employed?

In my most recent published work, I referenced an article from Canada’s National Post which ran with the headline ‘CBSA says it’s investigating border officer spreading COVID conspiracies online.’

The problem with these kinds of articles is that they are too often merely used as hit pieces to ridicule, degrade, and discredit any individual or group that goes against a certain narrative or disagrees with an author’s (or their publication’s partisanship or funders’) views.

Moreover, their authors very seldom make specific references or claims as to why they label their targets when using such over-used and over-abused disparaging rhetoric. When this is the case, it leads me to believe that the overall purpose of their pieces is to disparage their targets more than anything else.

Another recent example of this involves that from the article entitled ‘Network of Syria conspiracy theorists identified – study’ written by Mark Townsend from The Guardian (UK). In the article, the author claimed “journalist Aaron Maté at the Grayzone is said by the report to have overtaken Beeley as the most prolific spreader of disinformation among the 28 conspiracy theorists identified.” Maté had to refute the claim made against him which also involved contacting Townsend by phone. His counter article and the phone conversation appear on his Substack page (see ‘NATO-backed network of Syria dirty war propagandists identified)’ and is definitely an interesting case on how these ploys take place.

Countless other instances could be cited, but suffice it to say that there is no shortage of them.

But what is perhaps even more laughable with this phenomenon is the fact that these authors wantonly use these terms without even knowing their true meanings and where they actually originate from.

Before looking into these, though, we must first and foremost examine the meaning of the word ‘conspiracy’ itself. Oxford defines it as:

a secret plan by a group of people to do something harmful or illegal

Conspiracies have been an integral part of humanity ever since people have bonded together in groups for a better chance at survival.

Lord knows that history is riddled with an abundant supply of conspiracies and we will look at some notable examples later on.

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‘Conspiracy Author’ David Icke Banned From EU, Labeled A “Terrorist”

Conspiracy author David Icke has been banned from entering the EU and designated as a “level three terrorist,” according to his son Gareth Icke.

The public speaker and former BBC television host was due to attend an event in Amsterdam this weekend, but will now reportedly be prevented from entering any country in the European Union for a period of two years.

“Received an email from the Dutch. My dad, David Icke, has been banned from entering the EU for two years,” tweeted Gareth Icke. “They claim he is a “level three terrorist,” he added.

“The old man is banned from entering the Netherlands,” wrote Icke in another tweet. “Zero convictions, zero crimes committed. Banned by the government. Wow.”

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Why Society Needs “Conspiracy Theories” and “Conspiracy Theorists”. It‘s No Secret that We’ve been Lied To

It seems like you can’t catch a news headline or social media post these days without coming across the terms conspiracy theory and conspiracy theorist, or phrases like ‘spreading conspiracies’. One has to wonder: why are they so frequently employed?

In my most recent published work, I referenced an article from Canada’s National Post which ran with the headline ‘CBSA says it’s investigating border officer spreading COVID conspiracies online.’

The problem with these kinds of articles is that they are too often merely used as hit pieces to ridicule, degrade, and discredit any individual or group that goes against a certain narrative or disagrees with an author’s (or their publication’s partisanship or funders’) views.

Moreover, their authors very seldom make specific references or claims as to why they label their targets when using such over-used and over-abused disparaging rhetoric. When this is the case, it leads me to believe that the overall purpose of their pieces is to disparage their targets more than anything else.

Another recent example of this involves that from the article entitled ‘Network of Syria conspiracy theorists identified – study’ written by Mark Townsend from The Guardian (UK). In the article, the author claimed “journalist Aaron Maté at the Grayzone is said by the report to have overtaken Beeley as the most prolific spreader of disinformation among the 28 conspiracy theorists identified.” Maté had to refute the claim made against him which also involved contacting Townsend by phone. His counter article and the phone conversation appear on his Substack page (see ‘NATO-backed network of Syria dirty war propagandists identified)’ and is definitely an interesting case on how these ploys take place.

Countless other instances could be cited, but suffice it to say that there is no shortage of them.

But what is perhaps even more laughable with this phenomenon is the fact that these authors wantonly use these terms without even knowing their true meanings and where they actually originate from.

Before looking into these, though, we must first and foremost examine the meaning of the word ‘conspiracy’ itself. Oxford defines it as:

a secret plan by a group of people to do something harmful or illegal

Conspiracies have been an integral part of humanity ever since people have bonded together in groups for a better chance at survival.

Lord knows that history is riddled with an abundant supply of conspiracies and we will look at some notable examples later on.

Keep reading

Conspiracy theorist suspected to be behind the cult that believes Satan-worshipping, cannibalistic child molesters are controlling the world moves to Australia

A prominent US conspiracy theorist rumoured to be behind the QAnon movement has been spotted in Australia with evidence he might be staying Down Under.

Ron Watkins is the site administrator of 8kun, formerly known as 8Chan, an internet image board that’s become a base for conspiracy theories, the far right, white supremacy and Nazism.

The American, under the anonymous account name ‘Q’, played a major role in spreading the QAnon conspiracy theory that claims the world is controlled by Satan-worshipping cannibalistic child molesters on the websites 4chan, 8chan and 8kun.

Watkins also promoted misinformation about Covid-19 and the conspiracy theory that Joe Biden beat Donald Trump in the 2020 US presidential election due to electoral fraud.

QAnon Anonymous podcast host Julian Feeld shared a post to his Twitter account on Wednesday alleging that Watkins was in Sydney and was intending to live in Australia.

Feeld, who has spent years researching and debunking conspiracy theories, says he got the information from a source that wished to remain anonymous.

‘Ron Watkins was in Sydney, Australia with the apparent intention to settle there on July 26th,’ he wrote.

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CONTROLLED OPPOSITION AND THE TRUTH MOVEMENT

I’ve been in this “game” since the ’90s and went deep down the rabbit hole, including many dead ends, detours, and distractions. There is a LOT of nonsense out there in the “conspiracy world” as well, not just the MSM and official cult-ure. Many truth seekers are stuck in over-simplified black and white thinking – out of body, disassociated, glued to the computer screen. Or they claim that their “intuition” and “feelings” tell them that this person or that event is a “psy-op”, “controlled opposition,” or “shill.” Feelings and perceptions can be very deceptive, and people tend to mistake all kinds of impressions, feelings, perceptions [unconscious shadow projections], and thoughts for their “intuition” or “gut feeling.”

I’m not taking myself out of the equation. I had done it too at times, primarily when I was only focused on external information and not engaged in any sincere self-work. I still have my subjective blind spots because I’m not enlightened, i.e., awake in the word’s true meaning.

In this day and age of global upheaval, it is also important to zoom out and understand the greater cosmic forces at work in light of the evolution of consciousness: diving deeper into esoteric work, understanding occult/divine laws, esoteric evolutionary astrology, the cycles of the ages, the different levels of being within humanity, the process of soul evolution, etc. At the same time, I would never claim to have “figured it all out.” The learning never stops, and the mind can become a prison in this information war.

Many “red-pilled” folks tend to project their unconscious shadow and unresolved unconscious stuff externally. They claim to know precisely what is going on with very rigid ideas of what is “true” and what are “lies,” who are the “good guys,” and who is a “shill” and “controlled op” or “psy-op.” Sometimes things can be self-evident, but often, it is not as simple, far from it.

I have had to eat humble cake many times to realize that truth is a much more delicate process and way more nuanced, deep, subtle, and complex [going way beyond what the mind can comprehend] than these superficial labels and accusations that are thrown around by the social media conspiracy “red-pilled” community these days – especially over the past two years since the p[l]andemic started.

Moreover, seeking the truth is an internal job, first and foremost. Yet, most people are mostly externally focused with a very superficial level of information gathering, not realizing how they are getting trapped in their minds. In its essence, the matrix is a mind program working through us/you.

Don’t get me wrong; there are definitely “controlled ops,” “psy-ops” and COINTELPRO (Counter Intelligence Programs) in the 3D matrix, as I’ve written about many times as well [even back in the 90s]. However, these terms are highly abused these days by overly paranoid “everything-is-a-trap” fringe conspiracy folks who have not done much self-work at all to be aware of their psyche, mind, conditioning/programming, shadow, projections, and trauma responses and childhood wounds which we ALL have.

Ironically, “the matrix has them” too, as Neil Kramer once said; they are caught in the “2nd matrix,” as he coined it, prisoners of their own paranoid mind.

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Meet the Conspiracy Theorist Behind Twitter’s ‘Crisis Misinformation Policy’

Twitter’s pick to stop the spread of misinformation in times of crisis has a history of pushing falsehoods.

Yoel Roth, the head of Twitter’s safety and integrity unit, unveiled the site’s “crisis misinformation policy” on Thursday. In a blog post, Roth outlined how Twitter will place warning labels on tweets deemed to contain misinformation and prevent them from being “amplified or recommended” in times of armed conflict, natural disasters, or public health emergencies.

Roth is a questionable pick to launch the policy, given his own track record with misinformation. Roth oversaw Twitter’s decision to block the sharing of an October 2020 New York Post report on emails from Hunter Biden’s abandoned laptop. Roth told the Federal Election Commission he made the decision based on “rumors” shared by the United States government’s intelligence community that the Russian government might release materials hacked from Hunter Biden.

There has been no credible evidence that Biden’s laptop was hacked, or that Russia played a role in publishing emails from it. Former Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey later admitted that blocking the article was “a total mistake.”

Roth came under fire earlier in 2020 for referring to Trump officials as “actual Nazis” in a 2017 tweet. He also called Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) a “bag of farts.”

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