Arizona Senate President Says 2020 Election Audit’s Ballot Count Doesn’t Match Maricopa Tally

Arizona Senate President Karen Fann on Tuesday said that the 2020 presidential election audit’s ballot count led by Cyber Ninjas differed from the Maricopa County tally, and that the discrepancy prompted the election review team to acquire new machines to recount the ballots.

“They haven’t released a number yet,” Fann, a Republican, said during in an interview with KTAR. “However, we do know that those numbers do not match with Maricopa County at this point.”

Jack Sellers, the chairman of the county’s Board of Supervisors, told The Epoch Times in an emailed statement that he was not surprised by the claim.

“While experienced professionals at the County used the latest certified tabulation technology and established processes to count almost 2.1 million ballots in accordance with Arizona law, the Senate contractors have taken a different approach. They’ve cycled through processes and procedures, chasing conspiracy theories while volunteers with no elections experience tried to accurately count votes as they spun by on turntables. Elections experts from across the country have said this method is flawed and will produce incorrect results,” he said.

The Arizona Senate Democratic Caucus also pushed back against Fann’s remarks, saying in a Twitter post, “This is a lie.”

The caucus did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

According to Maricopa County’s official canvass (pdf), there were 2,089,563 ballots cast in its 2020 general election.

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Arizona plans to execute prisoners with the same deadly gas used by the Nazis at Auschwitz, documents show

The state of Arizona has plans to use hydrogen cyanide, the deadly gas used by the Nazis at Auschwitz and other extermination camps, to kill inmates on death row, documents obtained by The Guardian’s Ed Pilkington showed.

The Arizona Department of Corrections spent more than $2,000 in procuring the ingredients for the gas, The Guardian reported, citing the partially redacted documents.

The ingredients purchased include a solid brick of potassium cyanide, sodium hydroxide pellets, and sulfuric acid, the documents showed.

Cyanide is lethal in that it prevents the body from using oxygen. It was used in both World Wars — by French and Austrian troops in World War I, and by Nazi Germany in World War II, said a 2014 fact sheet by the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. The trade name for hydrogen cyanide is Zyklon B.

The department has also refurbished a gas chamber in Florence, Arizona, that was built in 1949 but had not been used for 22 years, The Guardian reported.

The chamber was tested for “operational functionality” and “air tightness” last August, and in December, following a refurbishment, officials “verbally indicated that the vessel is operationally ready.”

The documents published by The Guardian also included instructions on how to operate the gas chamber.

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DOJ Already Starting to Cast Doubt on Arizona Audit, Claims Investigation Could Have ‘Intimidating’ Effect on Voters

Conducting an audit on an open and fair election should not be an issue, especially when the audit can be easily observed by the public in real-time.

Yet, Democrats have left no stone unturned in their campaign to end the Arizona state Senate’s comprehensive forensic audit of all ballots cast in Maricopa County during the November presidential election.

Following months of obstruction via bogus lawsuits and a full-court press from heavyweight Washington lawyer Marc Elias (who commissioned the Steele dossier) and his many minions, influential Democrat-run organizations appealed to the Department of Justice late last week. Their efforts have born fruit. According to KNXV-TV, the DOJ has decided to get involved in some capacity in the matter.

This latest move smacks of desperation and leaves many Republicans wondering what has the Democrats running scared.

The DOJ Civil Rights Division’s Principle Deputy Assistant Attorney General Pamela Karlan wrote a letter to Karen Fann, the president of the Arizona state Senate, on Wednesday to express the department’s concerns about ballot security and potential voter intimidation arising from the forensic audit.

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Secretary of state fighting Arizona audit once vowed to use her office to help Dems take over

Democratic Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs promised while running for her current position in 2018 that if she were to win she would help Democrats prevail in races statewide.

Hobbs made the pledge at a Democratic candidates forum in the spring of that year, saying, “We going to do very well electing statewide Democrats, and the secretary of state’s office is how we’re going to hold on to those wins, how we’re going to continue to make gains in the legislature and really create a state that reflects all of our values.”

That does not sound like the type of partisan mindset you want in the official overseeing the state’s election, but she narrowly won.

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Spy Plane Identified Circling the Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum Where the Election Audit Is Taking Place – What’s Going On?

A spy plane was identified flying over the Maricopa County audit.
What information are they after?

Sunday morning we were alerted to the fact that a plane was circling around the Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum last week.  We received only the picture above.  We followed up and found more information on this plane and additional information on other events where a plane circled the sky in a similar fashion.  One such incident was in San Bernadino after the shooting spree by Islamic terrorists Farook and Malik.

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Maricopa County Was Given $3 Million of ‘Zuckerbucks’ Before Election But No One Knows Who Received It and What It Was Used For!

Where did the millions go? Maricopa County Arizona, one of the largest counties in the nation, received $3 million in ‘Zuckerbucks’ from a Democrat non-profit before the election. No one knows who accepted it or where it went.

In addition to repeatedly sabotaging attempts by the Arizona Senate to implement an accurate, transparent, and factual forensic audit of Maricopa’s 2020 election – which is set to actually begin on April 22 – the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors (MCBOS) also repeatedly violated the chain of custody of the 2.1 million ballots from the 2020 election which this Board is legally responsible for safeguarding. Under their watch things like shredded ballots ended up in a dumpster; doors were left wide open at the Maricopa County Tabulation and Election Center (MCTEC); a gigantic, mysterious fire occurred at a chicken farm owned by one of the supervisors of the MCBOS; and, all of the ballots were without the AZ Senate’s permission literally moved out of the MCTEC and then brought back home again (who knows where these ballots went for a ride and how many never came back).

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Arizona State Dean: Grading Writing Based On Quality Is ‘Racist,’ Promotes ‘White Language Supremacy’

In a book titled “Labor-Based Grading Contracts: Building Equity and Inclusion in the Compassionate Writing Classroom,” professor Asao Inoue encourages teachers to ditch grading for a “labor-based” grading system wherein students earn grades based on their effort. The quality of a student’s writing would not help or hinder their course grade. 

“This book focuses on one kind of grading contract, one that calculates final course grades purely by the labor students complete, not by any judgments of the quality of their writing,” Inoue writes. “While the qualities of student writing is still at the center of the classroom and feedback, it has no bearing on the course grade.”

Near the beginning of the document, the author admits that the theory of “labor-based” grading is rooted in critical race theory. Critical race theory is the idea that America is rooted in racism as are the systems of modern American society.

Critical race theory contributed to Inoue’s idea that ranking things is a system rooted in racism. Because grading is a form of ranking, grading must also be a racist idea. In his book, Inoue dubbed grading and the education system writ large “racist” for their connections to ranking. 

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Arizona Education Department Provides ‘Equity Toolkit’ That Shows Racism Starts At 3 Months Old

The Arizona Department of Education reportedly created an “equity toolkit” that includes an infographic that shows how racism develops in children as young as three-months old, and recommended readings that suggest that white people are “ignorant, color-blind, and racist,” Discovery Institute scholar Christopher Rufo reported.

The toolkit shows a spectrum of children from birth to ages over six, with the title “They’re not too young to talk about race!” It cites a study that shows at birth, “babies look equally at faces of all races. At 3 months, babies look more at faces that match the race of their caregivers.” 

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Arizona’s $24-Million Prison Management Software Is Keeping People Locked Up Past The End Of Their Sentences

The Arizona Department of Corrections is depriving inmates of freedom they’ve earned. Its $24 million tracking software isn’t doing what it’s supposed to when it comes to calculating time served credits. That’s according to whistleblowers who’ve been ignored by the DOC and have taken their complaints to the press. Here’s Jimmy Jenkins of KJZZ, who was given access to documents showing the bug has been well-documented and remains unfixed, more than a year after it was discovered.

According to Arizona Department of Corrections whistleblowers, hundreds of incarcerated people who should be eligible for release are being held in prison because the inmate management software cannot interpret current sentencing laws.

KJZZ is not naming the whistleblowers because they fear retaliation. The employees said they have been raising the issue internally for more than a year, but prison administrators have not acted to fix the software bug. The sources said Chief Information Officer Holly Greene and Deputy Director Joe Profiri have been aware of the problem since 2019.

The management software (ACIS) rolled out during the 2019 Thanksgiving holiday weekend, which is always the best time to debut new systems that might need a lot of immediate tech support. Since its rollout, the software has generated 19,000 bug reports. The one at the center of this ongoing deprivation of liberty arose as the result of a law passed in June of that year. The law gave additional credit days to inmates charged with low-level drug offenses, increasing the credit from one day for every six served to three days for every seven.

Qualified inmates are only supposed to serve 70% of their sentences, provided they also complete some other prerequisites, like earning a GED or entering a substance abuse program. That law hasn’t been implemented in the Arizona prison system because the $24 million software can’t seem to figure out how to do it.

To be sure, legislation that changes time served credits for only a certain percentage of inmates creates problems for prison management systems. But that’s why you spend $24 million buying one, rather than just asking employees if they’re any good at Excel.

But that’s what has actually happened. With the expensive software unable to correctly calculate time served credits, prison employees are doing it by hand.

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Arizona Secretary of State Rejects ‘Independent Analysis’ of Voting Data, Says It Would Amplify Baseless Theories

Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs (D) rejected a request for an “independent analysis” of voting data in the state, concluding that it would simply amplify the voices of people who seek to “undermine our democratic process for political gain.”

“It is patently unreasonable to suggest that, despite there being zero credible evidence of any impropriety or widespread irregularities, election officials nonetheless have a responsibility to prove a negative,” Hobbs wrote in response to Arizona Senate President Karen Fann (R), who requested an “independent analysis” of voting data to restore confidence and credibility among residents.

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