Gay Rights Organization Gets Deplatformed By PayPal While Pro-Pedophile Group Remains

A gay rights organization was deplatformed by PayPal and its subsidiary Venmo, only to discover on Thursday that pro-pedophile organization Prostasia continues to be on good business terms with the multinational financial technology company.

Gays Against Groomers, an organization comprised entirely of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and even transgender people, launched in 2022 and has had meteoric success at attracting followers to their cause exposing the harms done to children by some radicals hiding behind the LGBTQ banner. Gays Against Groomers wrote early on Tuesday that PayPal and Venmo had dropped them for “violating” their user agreement.

“The fact that an organization comprised solely of gay people, with trans contributors as well, is being banned from the largest payment processors in the country for opposing the sexualization and mutilation of children is shocking, to say the least,” said Jaimee Michell, the Gays Against Groomers founder.

“On top of that, we discovered tonight that while we have been banned, an organization that literally runs a support group for pedophiles is able to use PayPal’s services. It tells you all you need to know about the state of our society right now,” Michell added.

The gay rights advocacy group is the latest to be targeted by PayPal for challenging dominant leftist narratives surrounding sex and gender. Evolutionary biologist Colin Wright, writer Ian Miles Cheong, and recently the Free Speech Union and the Daily Scepticrun by conservative editor Toby Young, have all had their accounts permanently closed by PayPal without notice.

Ironically, PayPal sported a banner that said “Open For All” on Twitter during Pride month in June, which their U.K. account still displays. While critics of leftist ideology are denied the ability to conduct commerce, PayPal remains open for business with the openly pedophilic advocacy group Prostasia. Prostasia accepts donations through their website by credit card, check, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, as well as PayPal and Venmo.

Of particular concern is a forum hosted by Prostasia called the MAP Support Club (MSC), which is described as a “chat-based peer-support network for teenagers and adults who self-identify as being attracted to younger minors.” MAP Support Club invites “minor attracted people” aged 13 years old and up to participate in online chats about “minor attraction.”

“It is intended as a community where MAPs can connect with one another, offer and receive support in difficult times, and overall just enjoy a relaxed atmosphere where one can have fun and not be judged,” reads the MAP Support Club website.

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Good News for You Dumb People: YouTube Thought Police Think for You, Big Tech’s Bots Look After Your Best Interests

There’s an interesting moment in a recent YouTube video posted by Dr. John Campbell, a nurse educator who shares informational videos about the latest SARS-CoV-2 and other science on his educational channel. After reviewing government data, Campbell pauses for several seconds and scratches his head. A few beats later he mumbles an apology to the audience, confessing that his head felt a little itchy.

There was no hint from the deadpan tone that Campbell was doing anything other than scratching an itch. But, as some of his over 2.45 million loyal subscribers have boldly pointed out in the comment section, in recent videos Campbell seems darker than usual, almost depressed. Indeed, the nurse educator appears to be doing a lot of hand-wringing and head scratching lately.

It seems, however, that Campbell cannot openly share his concerns with his audience without putting his channel in jeopardy. In order to continue to post videos on YouTube, as he explored in that same head-scratching video, he must censor himself or risk being de-platformed.

YouTube Censors Vaccine Safety and Efficacy Information

YouTube has written guidelines against making videos that discuss vaccine safety, efficacy, and necessity.

This “vaccine misinformation policy” reads: “YouTube doesn’t allow content that poses a serious risk of egregious harm by spreading medical misinformation about currently administered vaccines that are approved and confirmed to be safe and effective by local health authorities and by the World Health Organization (WHO). This is limited to content that contradicts local health authorities’ or the WHO’s guidance on vaccine safety, efficacy, and ingredients.”

The policy applies to vaccine safety, vaccine efficacy, and even information about vaccine ingredients (pdf).

In fact, YouTube will actively delete any content that suggests that vaccines may cause chronic side effects, “outside of rare side effects that are recognized by health authorities.”

This includes YouTube videos posted by medical doctors, scientists, academic researchers, and even patients who have themselves suffered from side effects.

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NBC News Asks Twitter, TikTok to Censor Videos of John Fetterman Speaking

NBC News falsely claimed that footage of John Fetterman struggling to speak during a recent rally was “doctored” and urged social media companies to censor. Fetterman, who suffered a stroke earlier this year, has struggled with public speaking while recovering, something the senate hopeful has himself admitted to. The outlet flagged videos of Fetterman speaking to Twitter and TikTok, baselessly claiming that they were in violation of their political misinformation policies. TikTok complied and removed the videos.

NBC News took issue with highlight reels of a recent Montgomery County rally in which Fetterman struggled through parts of his speech. The outlet accused one prominent conservative social media account of deceptively editing video of speeches to “create the perception that what he was saying was nonsensical.”

The report accused social media platforms of ignoring their own policies “against political misinformation” in allowing the videos to stay up.

NBC News Deputy Editor of technology Benjamin Goggin wrote, “Deceptively edited videos that have been viewed hundreds of thousands of times on Twitter and TikTok exaggerate the speech issues that have plagued John Fetterman, the Democratic nominee for Pennsylvania’s open U.S. Senate seat, after he had a stroke in May.”

Explaining the alleged edits, Goggin claimed they consisted of “cutting out the sound of the audience to make it appear as if he had abruptly stopped speaking (some of the stops occurred when he was pausing during moments of applause and crowd reaction, according to unedited videos seen by NBC News).”

The NBC News reporter singled out popular digital strategist Greg Price, whose supercut of Fetterman’s speech had been 600,000 times when the report was published.

Goggin claimed that the videos violate Twitter and TikTok’s policies “against political misinformation,” and the outlet flagged these videos for the platforms itself. TikTok ultimately removed the videos from its platform.

“So NBC News decided to accuse me of doctoring videos of John Fetterman that I posted. (I didn’t doctor anything),” Price wrote in a tweet. “They also reached out to Twitter to try and get them censored.”

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Why are hard drive companies investing in DNA data storage?

The research community is excited about the potential of DNA to function as long-term archival storage. That’s largely because it’s extremely dense, chemically stable for tens of thousands of years, and comes in a format we’re unlikely to forget how to read. While there has been some interesting progress, efforts have mostly stayed in the research community because of the high costs and extremely slow read and write speeds. These are problems that need to be solved before DNA-based storage can be practical.

So we were surprised to hear that storage giant Seagate had entered into a collaboration with a DNA-based storage company called Catalog. To find out how close the company’s technology is to being useful, we talked to Catalog’s CEO, Hyunjun Park. Park indicated that Catalog’s approach is counterintuitive on two levels: It doesn’t store data the way you’d expect, and it isn’t focusing on archival storage at all.

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Bomb explodes at Northeastern University with note citing Mark Zuckerberg

A suspicious package sent to Northeastern University exploded on Tuesday injuring one staff member, according to officials. The package contained a message criticizing Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. 

Just after 7 p.m. on Tuesday, a package that was delivered to Holmes Hall detonated after it was opened by a staff member who sustained “minor injuries” from the explosion, Northeastern University said in a statement. 

The staff member was transported to a local hospital. The explosion triggered a multi-agency response, including the Boston Police Department’s Bomb Squad, Boston Emergency Management Services, and other law enforcement agencies. 

The university said the building was evacuated and nearby evening classes were canceled. 

“The safety and well-being of our community is always our most important priority,” the school’s statement added. 

Federal law enforcement sources told CNN that the package included a message criticizing Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, as well as the connection between academia and virtual reality. 

The package contained a hard plastic container that exploded when the university staff member unlatched and lifted the lid. 

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Biden’s Sneaky Censors

“Tech platforms are notoriously opaque,” the White House complained last week, saying Americans deserve to know more about how online forums decide “when and how to remove content from their sites.” Yet the Biden administration, which routinely pressures social media companies to suppress speech it does not like, is hardly a model of transparency in this area.

In a lawsuit filed last May, Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry and Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt argue that the administration’s “Orwellian” crusade against “misinformation” violates the First Amendment. They are trying to find out more about this “vast ‘Censorship Enterprise’ across a multitude of federal agencies,” and the administration is fighting them every step of the way.

So far, Landry and Schmitt have identified 45 federal officials who “communicate with social media platforms” about curtailing “misinformation.” Emails obtained during discovery show those platforms are desperate to comply with the government’s demands for speech restrictions, including the removal of specific messages and accounts.

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Yet another “whistleblower” means yet more censorship

Anew Twitter “whistleblower” has come forward. Peiter “Mudge” Zatko, allegedly a former hacker and Twitter’s ex-head of security, testified in front of congress today, with dire warnings about the business practices of the social media giant.

Did he talk about the company’s egregious attacks on their users’ free speech under the guise of “protecting” the public?

Did he mention the suppression of alternative and independent journalism through practices such as “shadow-banning” and discretely removing followers?

Perhaps he told them about how, like all major social media platforms, it is so cross-pollinated with intelligence assets it may as well be considered just another branch of the Deep State.

No, none of that. His main concern is that Twitter’s security is too lax, and that the platform’s “cyber-security failures” leave it potentially open to “exploitation” that can “cause real harm to real people”.

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Facebook Fact-Checkers Are Now Dropping by the Comments Sections of Your Posts to Re-Educate You

Facebook just keeps finding new ways to be awful. The latest stunt is to jump into the comments section of your posts to insert some approved agitprop that stays near the top of your feed.

This particular “fact” check concerns an estimate from a car dealership showing that a customer would be charged nearly $30,000 for an EV battery for his Chevy Volt. A Facebook page called Car Coach Reports, which focuses on auto news, posted a picture of the invoice on August 29. Two days later, PolitiFact waded into the comments section to add their take on the story—namely that the battery in question was for a 10-year-old vehicle with 70,000 miles that is no longer under warranty. PolitiFact wrote, “The battery had to be purchased from a third-party supplier because General Motors discontinued the Volt in 2018 and no longer makes the battery.” They quickly added that newer batteries “cost much less.”

On the “fact” checker’s website we learn that “The average cost of a replacement battery in an electric vehicle is about $6,300… though that price can be higher depending on the vehicle in question.” Prices can range anywhere from $6000 to $20,000.

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Over 50 Biden Administration Employees, 12 US Agencies Involved in Social Media Censorship Push: Documents

Over 50 officials in President Joe Biden’s administration across a dozen agencies have been involved with efforts to pressure Big Tech companies to crack down on alleged misinformation, according to documents released on Aug. 31.

Senior officials in the U.S. government, including White House lawyer Dana Remus, deputy assistant to the president Rob Flaherty, and onetime White House senior COVID-19 adviser Andy Slavitt, have been in touch with one or more major social media companies to try to get the companies to tighten rules on allegedly false and misleading information on COVID-19, and take action against users who violate the rules, the documents show.

In July 2021, for instance, after Biden said that Facebook was “killing people” by not combating misinformation effectively, an executive at Meta reached out to Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, a Biden appointee, to say that government and Meta teams met after the remarks “to better understand the scope of what the White House expects from us on misinformation going forward.”

The same executive later wrote to Murthy saying, “I wanted to make sure you saw the steps we took just this past week to adjust policies on what we are removing with respect to misinformation, as well as steps taken to further address the ‘disinfo dozen,’” including removing pages linked to the group.

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Google to bans apps containing “misleading health claims that contradict existing medical consensus”

The Android app store, Google Play, has introduced sweeping new rules that ban apps containing what the tech giant deems to be “misleading health claims that contradict existing medical consensus, or can cause harm to users.”

The new rules are part of a Google Play “health misinformation” policy that came into force on August 31. Some of the examples of in-app content that’s banned under this new policy include “misleading claims about vaccines, such as that vaccines can alter one’s DNA,” “advocacy of harmful, unapproved treatments,” and “advocacy of other harmful health practices, such as conversion therapy.”

Google’s new policy comes at a time when the medical consensus has changed multiple times over the last few years. In 2020 Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), said that Pfizer’s reported 90% COVID-19 vaccine efficacy rate was “extraordinary.” In 2021, Fauci said the vaccine will “protect you against the surging of the delta variant.” But this year, former White House COVID response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx admitted that she “knew” COVID vaccines would not prevent infection.

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