BLM Activist Got Rich on Fat Salary While Ignoring Project for Which He Raised Money

Race hoaxer Shaun King is now famous for more than pushing lies on Twitter about whites who supposedly attacked or killed blacks, then deleting the tweets.

Now his name is in the news for looting his Grassroots Law Project of hundreds of thousands of dollars in wages.

A report on the financial shenanigans in The Daily Beast is the third major black eye for an outfit connected to the bigger ongoing hoax called Black Lives Matter. In early August, King landed in hot water for purchasing an expensive dog with Grassroots Law funds. In late August, a lawsuit accused a top BLM leader of purloining $10 million from the BLM Global Network.

The racial grievance business is booming.

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Black Lives Matter Leader Accused of Stealing $10 Million: ‘Personal Piggy Bank’

A leader of the Black Lives Matter Global Foundation is being accused in a lawsuit of stealing $10 million from the group and using it for his “personal piggy bank.”

The lawsuit from former colleagues called Shalomyah Bowers a “rogue administrator, a middle man turned usurper,” according to a report in the Los Angeles Times.

The complaint claimed that Bowers led the Black Lives Matter Global Foundation into “multiple investigations by the Internal Revenue Service and various state attorney generals, blazing a path of irreparable harm to BLM in less than eighteen months.”

The lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Thursday by a group calling itself Black Lives Grassroots.

“While BLM leaders and movement workers were on the street risking their lives, Mr. Bowers remained in his cushy offices devising a scheme of fraud and misrepresentation to break the implied-in-fact contract between donors and BLM,” the suit added.

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Pet Project: BLM Activist Shaun King Used Donor Funds To Buy $40k Thoroughbred Show Dog

Shaun King’s social justice PAC is going to the dogs. Literally.

Grassroots Law PAC, which the progressive grifter founded to elect soft-on-crime local officials, paid roughly $40,000 since December to the California-based Potrero Performance Dogs, according to campaign finance disclosures. The payments are labeled for “contractor services,” making their purpose difficult to discern. But days after a $30,650 payment in February, King welcomed a “new member of the King family”: an award-winning mastiff bred by Potrero named Marz.

King, who has been hounded for years by allegations of fraud, has not been accused of any wrongdoing in relation to Grassroots Law. But the payments for a dog raises questions about whether the former Bernie Sanders surrogate is using PAC contributions the way donors intended.

“This luxury dog expense may not be illegal for a PAC, but it shows little respect for King’s donors,” said Scott Walter, the president of Capital Research Center, which investigates left-wing groups. An heiress of the Hormel meatpacking empire is the PAC’s largest donor. Facebook cofounder Dustin Moskovitz and his wife donated millions of dollars to Real Justice PAC, which King launched in 2018 and works closely with Grassroots Law.

Grassroots Law PAC, which aims to “elect candidates who are committed to reducing mass incarceration and police violence,” has spent nearly as much on King’s pet as it has on political candidates. The PAC has contributed around $56,000 to political candidates since 2021. It paid $10,000 to Potrero in December and another $30,650 on Feb. 16.

King has come under fire over the years amid repeated failures at his various social justice endeavors. The mother of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Ohio boy killed by police, said King “robbed” her by holding unauthorized fundraisers in her son’s name. A former King ally, DeRay Mckesson, has publicly accused him of fraud. Real Justice PAC was ordered in December to pay $30,000 to the city of Philadelphia for campaign finance violations in the race to elect District Attorney Larry Krasner (D.).

King has denied allegations of fraud, chalking his failed projects up to poor management or false claims from his enemies. He released an audit in 2019 that said he received a $4,166 monthly salary from Real Justice PAC and “no compensation at all” from Action PAC, the predecessor to Grassroots Law PAC. He said he was “literally the only person” on Action PAC’s staff who does not get paid.

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“Closed for Fumigation”: BLM Chapter Co-Founder Arrested After Hundreds of Cockroaches Released in New York Courthouse

The co-founder of the Black Lives Matter chapter in Upstate New York was arrested last week after left-wing demonstrators released hundreds of cockroaches inside an Albany courthouse as she was facing arraignment.

Following the incident on Tuesday, Clyanna Lightbourn, 34, was taken into custody by the Albany PD and charged with obstruction of governmental administration, tampering with physical evidence, resisting arrest, and disorderly conduct, police reports revealed.

Lightbourn, in addition to three other activists, appeared in court for their scheduled arraignment, but, during the preceding, several BLM members in the audience began a planned disruption inside of the courtroom, according to the Washington Times.

In addition to the typical screeching and mindless chanting, the crazed activists released hundreds of cockroaches from Tupperware containers that were smuggled into the building, forcing the courtroom to close for the rest of the day in order to be fumigated.

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BLM founder Patrisse Cullors paid her baby father $970,000 for ‘creative services’, her brother $840,000 for security, a fellow director $2.1m and reimbursed the organization $73,000 for a charter flight

Newly released tax filings revealed how Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors used charity funds to pay her friends and family large sums for various ‘consulting’ services, as well as charter a private flight.

The documents reveal that BLM paid a company owned by Damon Turner, the father of Cullors’ child, nearly $970,000 to help ‘produce live events’ and provide other ‘creative services.’

The co-founder’s brother, Paul Cullors, received more than $840,000 for providing security services to the foundation. 

Leaders have attempted to justify the expense by saying the foundation’s protection could not be entrusted to former police professionals who typically run security firms because the BLM movement is known for vehemently protesting law enforcement organizations.

A consulting firm run by Shalomyah Bowers, who is BLM’s board secretary and has previously served as deputy executive director, was paid more than $2.1 million for providing the organization with operational support, including staffing, fundraising and other key services. 

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I Criticized BLM. Then I Was Fired.

Until recently, I was a director of data science at Thomson Reuters, one of the biggest news organizations in the world. It was my job, among other things, to sift through reams of numbers and figure out what they meant.

About a year ago, I stumbled on a really big story. It was about black Americans being gunned down across the country and the ways in which we report on that violence. We had been talking nonstop about race and police brutality, and I thought: This is a story that could save lives. This is a story that has to be told.

But when I shared the story with my coworkers, my boss chastised me, telling me expressing this opinion could limit my ability to take on leadership roles within the company. Then I was maligned by my colleagues. And then I was fired.

This is the story Reuters didn’t want to tell. 


I had been at Thomson Reuters for over six years—most recently, leading a team of data scientists applying new machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithms to our legal, tax and news data. We advised any number of divisions inside the company, including Westlaw, an online legal research service used by most every law firm in the country, and the newsroom, which reaches an audience of one billion every day around the globe. I briefed the Chief Technology Officer regularly. My total annual compensation package exceeded $350,000.

In 2020, I started to witness the spread of a new ideology inside the company. On our internal collaboration platform, the Hub, people would post about “the self-indulgent tears of white women” and the danger of “White Privilege glasses.” They’d share articles with titles like “Seeing White,” “Habits of Whiteness” and “How to Be a Better White Person.” There was fervent and vocal support for Black Lives Matter at every level of the company. No one challenged the racial essentialism or the groupthink.

This concerned me. I had been following the academic research on BLM for years (for example, hereherehere and here), and I had come to the conclusion that the claim upon which the whole movement rested—that police more readily shoot black people—was false. 

The data was unequivocal. It showed that, if anything, police were slightly less likely to use lethal force against black suspects than white ones. 

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BLM silent when confronted with data showing massive 2020 spike in Black murder victims

The Black Lives Matter organization was silent when approached for comment on 2020’s skyrocketing number of Black murders and experts citing BLM and the defund the police movements for contributing to the deaths. 

Fox News Digital reached out to the Black Lives Matter press team on April 14 inquiring if they had comment on FBI data showing there was a 32% increase in Black murders in 2020 compared to 2019, as well as a comment regarding experts such as the Manhattan Institute’s Heather Mac Donald arguing the BLM and defund the police movements contributed to the murder spike, not the coronavirus.

Fox News Digital also detailed the yearly numbers of Black murders from 2010 to 2020 within the inquiry but did not receive a response from the organization as of Tuesday morning. 

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BLM Co-Founder Says She Gets ‘Triggered’ by Charity Transparency Laws

Patrisse Cullors, the Black Lives Matter co-founder who cashed out and got millions of dollars in media contracts, says that the recent scrutiny of BLM’s “charitable” finances upsets her.

Black Lives Matter is embroiled in several scandals involving the $90 million they raised in 2020 to end police brutality and racism. The most recent eyebrow-raiser was the revelation that the group purchased a $6 million mansion in California that has rarely been used for the purposes they say.

There’s also the matter of the $60 million in funds that no one at BLM Global appears to be in charge of.

Cullors says she gets “triggered” when anyone mentions the IRS form 990 — the form charities must complete that reveals donors and sources of money.

Washington Examiner:

“I actually did not know what 990s were before all of this happened,” Cullors said, an apparent reference to the Washington Examiner’s reporting in January about BLM’s lack of financial and leadership transparency that led multiple states, including California, to order the charity to cease raising funds until it discloses what it did with the $90 million it raised in 2020.

Cullors said activists suffer trauma and that their lives are put at risk when charities under their control are required to disclose publicly what they did with their tax-deductible donations.

“This doesn’t seem safe for us, this 990 structure — this nonprofit system structure,” Cullors said. “This is, like, deeply unsafe. This is being literally weaponized against us, against the people we work with.”

The system that was designed to prevent fraudsters like Cullors from fleecing people is “deeply unsafe”? Isn’t that sort of like a bank robber complaining that it’s too difficult to open the safe and questioning why the cash can’t just be laid out in the open so it can be easily grabbed?

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Black Lives Matter shows how liberal groups weaponize social media censorship

The talking points have apparently gone out, and it is now OK for the mainstream press to gently criticize the Black Lives Matter movement. Accordingly, New York magazine has issued a critique of BLM’s financial management — particularly, the organization’s purchase in 2020 of a $6 million, 6,500 square foot house in Southern California.

Almost exactly a year ago, the New York Post reported on the purchase of four other multi-million dollar high-end homes by BLM co-founder Patrisse Cullors. The story described the homes no differently than it would any other celebrity home purchase. All the information contained in the article was gleaned from public records, including the photos. No addresses were listed.

But within days, users on Facebook were banned from sharing the story — on the platform itself, on Facebook messenger, and on Instagram, which Facebook owns. Despite the fact that all the information discussed was a matter of public record, Facebook flagged the article for violating their community standards, specifically the “privacy and personal information policy.”

A year later, Facebook (now Meta) still classifies the story as “abusive” and prevents it from being shared on its platforms.

Now we know why.

Buried in New York magazine’s reporting is this little nugget: “Other conversations on the BLM Security Hub chat show efforts to monitor social media for negative mentions of [the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation], with members using their influence with the platforms to have such remarks removed.”

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BLM’s charity status at risk over solicitation of funds to elect Democrats, watchdog says

The embattled national Black Lives Matter group used its charitable resources to solicit funds for its affiliated political action committee Tuesday, a move one expert called a “clear violation” of IRS charity rules.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation, the charity that represents the national BLM movement, voluntarily shut down its ability to raise money Feb. 2 following a Washington Examiner investigation into its lack of financial transparency that prompted multiple states to issue demands to the group to cease its fundraising activities.

Since then, BLM had refrained from using its email list to solicit contributions — until Tuesday, when it sent a message to its supporters that was signed “Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation” and contained what appeared at first glance to be a donation button to support the charity.

When clicked, however, the donation button sends supporters to a fundraising page for Black Lives Matter PAC, BLM’s affiliated political group that has worked to elect Democrats across the country since its launch in October 2020.

“BLM PAC is preparing for the most critical midterm election yet. Every single race is an opportunity to build Black political power,” the fundraising page linked in BLM’s charitable email states. “If you’re ready to continue the electoral fight for Black lives, chip in to our efforts and start building for the 2022 midterms.”

Paul Kamenar, an attorney for conservative watchdog group the National Legal and Policy Center, told the Washington Examiner that BLM’s use of charitable resources to solicit funds for overtly political activities “appears to be a clear violation of the IRS rules prohibiting charities from soliciting contributions to a political action committee.”

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