Glenn Greenwald SLAMS ‘study’ claiming he caused Taylor Lorenz to be targeted by ‘harmful speech’

Glenn Greenwald defended himself after a study accused him and Tucker Carlson of causing a NYT journalist to be targeted by online hate.

On Wednesday, journalist Glenn Greenwald shared an email he had received from an NBC producer citing a study that showed he and Tucker Carlson’s comments on former New York Times journalist Taylor Lorenz were linked to her receiving hate online. Greenwald responded, defending himself and arguing that high-profile journalists are not off-limits for criticism.

“We’re covering a recent study that found a segment on Fox News’ ‘Tucker Carlson Tonight’ and a Tweet send by you resulted in a ‘sharp increases in harmful speech’ directed toward [Lorenz],” the email from NBC producer Aaron Franco read.

The study in question was conducted by NYU’s Center for Social Media and Politics and the International Women’s Media Foundation. They claimed that “large-scale quantitative data … showed sharp increases in harmful speech after [Lorenz was] targeted by Carlson and Greenwald.”

Upon receiving the email, Greenwald penned a scathing response, lambasting the notion that journalists should be off-limits for criticism, and pointing out that he has been the victim of such attacks in the past.

“Every day,” Greenwald began, “employees of large media corporations such as NBC post insults and attacks which ‘target’ me and my journalism and me personally, often resulting in vile and bigoted attacks against me based on homophobia, anti-semitism, and the nature of my inter-racial marriage and family.”

“But I don’t whine about it or try to claim that nobody can criticize me or my work,” he continued, “because I understand that those who seek out a large and influential journalistic platform that affects people’s lives are fair game for criticisms, and that my critics aren’t responsible for the bigoted and hateful bile I receive daily as a result of the hatred they stimulate.”

He then took aim at Franco and other men shielding journalists like Lorenz, who he argues are actually enforcing the stereotypes that women and minorities are fragile and can’t defend themselves.

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50 years on, ‘A Clockwork Orange’ is more relevant than ever… It perfectly captures 2021’s dystopian depravity

Considered among the most controversial movies ever, Stanley Kubrick’s masterwork of sex and violence, first released in 1971, is also one of the most prescient, showcasing the performative victimhood now rife in our culture.

Fifty years ago, the Beethoven-loving Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) donned his droog uniform of all white, false eyelashes (on one eye), a bowler hat and prominent codpiece, and sang and danced into our twisted hearts with his brutally ironic – and ironically brutal – rendition of ‘Singin’ in the Rain’.

Yes, it’s been a whole five decades since ‘A Clockwork Orange, director Stanley Kubrick’s controversial masterpiece, was unleashed upon the public, and to mark the anniversary it’s being heavily promoted again. Apparently, time flies when you’re busy doing all that old in-out in-out and ultra-violence.

Kubrick’s highly stylized, now-iconic film, which was chock full of sex, violence, and sexual violence, shocked many – even esteemed film critic Pauline Kael notoriously lambasted the film and called Kubrick a “pornographer.”

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez reveals she’s in therapy following ‘attempted coup’ at Capitol

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says she is in therapy following the “all-out, attempted coup” at the Capitol on 6 January.

Speaking to the weekly public radio show Latino USA on Friday, Ms Ocasio-Cortez said members of Congress effectively “served in war” during the traumatising event that had “deeply affected lawmaking” and impacted the legislative process.

“After the 6th I took some time and it was really Ayanna Pressley when I explained to her what happened to me, like the day of, because I ran to her office and she was like, ‘you need to recognise trauma’,” Ms Ocasio-Cortez said.

“And I feel like I learned this the hard way after my father had passed away when I was a teenager… That happened at a young age and I locked it away. You have to live with it for years.”

Asked if she was in therapy, she replied: “Oh yeah, I’m doing therapy but also I’ve just slowed down. I think the Trump administration had a lot of us, especially Latino communities, in a very reactive mode.”

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The Evolutionary Advantages of Playing Victim

Victimhood is defined in negative terms: “the condition of having been hurt, damaged, or made to suffer.” Yet humans have evolved to empathize with the suffering of others, and to provide assistance so as to eliminate or compensate for that suffering. Consequently, signaling suffering to others can be an effective strategy for attaining resources. Victims may receive attention, sympathy, and social status, as well as financial support and other benefits. And being a victim can generate certain kinds of power: It can justify the seeking of retribution, provide a sense of legitimacy or psychological standing to speak on certain issues, and may even confer moral impunity by minimizing blame for victims’ own wrongdoings.

Presumably, most victims would eagerly forego such benefits if they were able to free themselves of their plight. But when victimhood yields benefits, it incentivizes people to signal their victimhood to others or to exaggerate or even fake victimhood entirely. This is especially true in contexts that involve alleged psychic harms, and where appeals are made to third-parties, with the claimed damage often being invisible, unverifiable, and based exclusively on self-reports. Such circumstances allow unscrupulous people to take advantage of the kindness and sympathy of others by co-opting victim status for personal gain. And so, people do.

Newly published research indicates that people who more frequently signal their victimhood (whether real, exaggerated, or false) are more likely to lie and cheat for material gain and denigrate others as a means to get ahead. Victimhood signaling is associated with numerous morally undesirable personality traits, such as narcissism, Machiavellianism (willingness to manipulate and exploit others for self-benefit), a sense of entitlement, and lower honesty and humility.

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Researchers identify a new personality construct that describes the tendency to see oneself as a victim

A new personality construct has been defined that describes people who persistently see themselves as victims within interpersonal conflicts. The research was published in Personality and Individual Differences.

Study authors Rahav Gabay and team describe how the social world is satiated with interpersonal transgressions that are often unpleasant and seemingly unwarranted, such as being interrupted when speaking. While some people can easily brush off these moments of hurt, others tend to ruminate over them and persistently paint themselves as a victim. The authors present this feeling of being the victim as a novel personality construct that influences how people make sense of the world around them.

The researchers call it the Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood (TIV), which they define as “an ongoing feeling that the self is a victim, which is generalized across many kinds of relationships.”

Through a series of eight studies among Israeli adults, Gabay and associates sought to test the validity of the construct of TIV and explore the behavioral, cognitive, and emotional consequences of such a personality trait.

An initial three studies established the TIV as a consistent and stable trait that involves four dimensions: moral elitism, a lack of empathy, the need for recognition, and rumination. A follow-up study further found that this tendency for victimhood is linked to anxious attachment  — an attachment style characterized by feeling insecure in one’s relationships — suggesting that the personality trait may be rooted in early relationships with caregivers.

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