Yuval Noah Harari | What To Do With All of These Useless People?

“Again, I think the biggest question in maybe in economics and politics of the coming decades will be what to do with all these useless people?

The problem is more boredom and how what to do with them and how will they find some sense of meaning in life, when they are basically meaningless, worthless?

My best guess, at present is a combination of drugs and computer games as a solution for [most]. It’s already happening. Under different titles, different headings, you see more and more people spending more and more time or solving their inner problems with the drugs and computer games, both legal drugs and illegal drugs.

You look at Japan today, Japan is maybe 20 years ahead of the world in everything. And you see all these new social phenomena of people having relationships with virtual; virtual spouses and you have people who never leave the house and just live through computers.

I think once you’re superfluous, you don’t have power.

Again, we are used to the Age of the Masses, of the 19th and 20th centuries…We saw all these successful massive uprisings; revolutions, revolts. So we got used to thinking about the masses as powerful. But this is basically a 19th century and 20th century phenomenon.

I don’t think that the masses, even if they they somehow organize themselves stand much of a chance. We are not in Russia of 1917 or in 19th century Europe.

What we are talking about now is like a second Industrial Revolution but the product this time will not be textiles or machines or vehicles or even weapons. The product this time will be humans, themselves.”

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A Weird, Stupid Dystopia

The last few days in the United States have seen a parade of wealthy freaks fellating each other’s egos and preening for the cameras in outlandish garb while ordinary Americans suffer more and more.

The weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner saw a gaggle of media celebrities congregate to congratulate one another on what a great job they’ve been doing bravely telling the truth and holding the most powerful government on earth to account. The host, Trevor Noah of The Daily Show, gushed with enthusiasm about how much freedom the press have in America to say things the powerful don’t like.

“As we sit in this room tonight, people, I really hope you all remember what the real purpose of this evening is,” Noah said. “Yes, it’s fun. Yes, we dress nice. Yes, the people eat, they drink, we have fun. But the reason we’re here is to honor and celebrate the fourth estates and what you stand for — what you stand for — an additional check and balance that holds power to account and gives voice to those who otherwise wouldn’t have one.”

“And if you ever begin to doubt your responsibilities, if you ever begin to doubt how meaningful it is, look no further than what’s happening in Ukraine,” said Noah. “Look at what’s happening there. Journalists are risking and even losing their lives to show the world what’s really happening. You realize how amazing it is. In America, you have the right to seek the truth and speak the truth even if it makes people in power uncomfortable, even if it makes your viewers or your readers uncomfortable. You understand how amazing that is? I stood here tonight and I made fun of the president of the United States, and I’m going to be fine. I am going to be fine, right? Do you really understand what a blessing it is?”

Of course there are people who’ve said things that US presidents don’t like who are not in fact fine. Julian Assange continues to waste away in Belmarsh Prison as the US government continues its efforts to extradite him to he can become the first publisher ever tried under the Espionage Act. Edward Snowden, an American, remains in exile because one US president after another continues to refuse to pardon his heroic whistleblowing about the sinister surveillance practices of the US intelligence cartel. Daniel Hale, also an American, sits in prison for exposing the depravity of America’s monstrous drone program.

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Which Dystopian Story Does 2022 Resemble the Most?

Imagine waking up one day unable to access your bank account because of your political beliefs. Imagine faking your facial expression whenever people were around to avoid committing “facecrime.” Imagine if the economy ground to a halt like a train that ran out of fuel. Does it sound far off?

It may sound like paranoid hyperbole to say we are living in a dystopia. But the core of valuable dystopian fiction is exploring what elements of our society have effects that would, if taken to the extreme, destroy our freedom and go against human dignity.

My Out of Frame colleagues have analyzed the meaning and relevance of a variety of dystopian fiction: Demolition ManThe Hunger GamesArcaneThe MatrixThe Handmaid’s TaleBrave New WorldV for Vendetta. But what dystopia is most relevant right now? Here are three contenders (excluding examples that bear similarity purely due to the presence of a pandemic).

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50 years on, ‘A Clockwork Orange’ is more relevant than ever… It perfectly captures 2021’s dystopian depravity

Considered among the most controversial movies ever, Stanley Kubrick’s masterwork of sex and violence, first released in 1971, is also one of the most prescient, showcasing the performative victimhood now rife in our culture.

Fifty years ago, the Beethoven-loving Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) donned his droog uniform of all white, false eyelashes (on one eye), a bowler hat and prominent codpiece, and sang and danced into our twisted hearts with his brutally ironic – and ironically brutal – rendition of ‘Singin’ in the Rain’.

Yes, it’s been a whole five decades since ‘A Clockwork Orange, director Stanley Kubrick’s controversial masterpiece, was unleashed upon the public, and to mark the anniversary it’s being heavily promoted again. Apparently, time flies when you’re busy doing all that old in-out in-out and ultra-violence.

Kubrick’s highly stylized, now-iconic film, which was chock full of sex, violence, and sexual violence, shocked many – even esteemed film critic Pauline Kael notoriously lambasted the film and called Kubrick a “pornographer.”

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CNN Uses Creepy, Dystopian “Before Times” Rhetoric to Justify Empty Shelves

Questions are being asked of CNN after the network used the creepy dystopian phrase “Before Times” to describe a time pre-COVID when grocery shelves weren’t empty.

The phrase appears in a report about how grocery shelves “are not going back to normal this year” as a result of labor shortages and transportation restrictions.

“If you hoped grocery stores this fall and winter would look like they did in the Before Times, with limitless options stretching out before you in the snack, drink, candy and frozen foods aisles, get ready for some disappointing news,” states the article.

Note how “Before Times” is emphasized by its seemingly otherwise unnecessary capitalization.

The dystopian language appears to be another way of socially engineering Americans to accept “the new normal,” which will include rolling lockdowns, energy crises and food shortages.

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Chicago Releases Feral Cats On City Streets To Tackle Explosion In Rat Population

Windy City? More like Ratty City.

Every year for the last six years, the city of Chicago has been named the rattiest in America, according to a report from a local TV station.

“In an unprecedented year, the visibility of rodents has increased, creating concern for homeowners and business owners alike. As reported in the Spring, the pandemic-driven closure of restaurants forced rodents to find new food sources,” said the Orkin pest control company, which puts together the annual ranking. “Without food waste to consume, these pests were seen scavenging new areas and exhibiting unusual or aggressive behavior. The presence of rodents became so relevant that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued Rodent Control guidance on ways to keep rats and mice out of homes and businesses. ”

But a city animal shelter has an answer: Feral cats — feral cats everywhere.

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