OnlyFans changes show payment processors and banks are major players in deciding what’s allowed to exist online

In April, MasterCard announced a policy change set to take effect on October 15 requiring “the banks that connect merchants to our network…to certify that the seller of adult content has effective controls in place to monitor, block and, where necessary, take down all illegal content.”

The idea of payment processors and banks rejecting tech platforms, causing them to struggle to survive, is nothing new.

Alternative social network Gab has struggled to be able to maintain a bank account and has faced constant deplatforming by payment processors. It has also been blacklisted from the Visa payment processor.

While such groups as National Center on Sexual Exploitation (NCOSE) have praised the payment processor crackdown on platforms such as OnlyFans, it’s clear that there’s an obvious exploit in how platforms work – that payment processors, with enough pressure, can shut down entire platforms overnight. This is especially a problem when there’s a  Visa and MasterCard duopoly in the payment processor market and simply two companies ultimately deciding what’s allowed to exist online.

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Liberal Journo Says ‘Someone Needs to Create Porn for Children’

A liberal “journalist” advocated for “porn for children” where “no one gets choked.”

Yes, really.

Writer Flora Gill, who boasts on her Twitter profile of writing for GQ, ST Style Magazine, The Sunday Times Magazine, and Evening Standard, claimed that children need “entry level porn.”

“Someone needs to create porn for children. Hear me out,” Gill tweeted Thursday. “Young teens are already watching porn but they’re finding hardcore, aggressive videos that give a terrible view of sex. They need entry level porn! A soft core site where everyone asks for consent and no one gets choked.”

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News Sites Including Huffington Post, Vox, Newsweek, Riddled With Pornography

On Thursday, news sites including the Washington Post, Vox, Newsweek, the Mirror, and the Huffington Post, displayed graphic hardcore pornography on some old articles.

Articles dating from 2015 to 2017 on a number of news websites that include embedded videos, including some with young audiences, are now displaying the pornography, all from a site called “5 Star HD Porn.” The discovery was first spotted by anonymous posters on 4chan, with a thread posted on the website’s /pol/ board detailing a number of articles that had been afflicted. The pornographic titles include such names as “Abigal and Eva are hungry for c*ck,” and “Megan gets stretched out.”

The articles ranged from “serious” mainstream news articles, such as a Washington Post story from January 2017 about Paul Ryan stopping somebody from dabbing in a photo, a Huffington Post article from May 2017 about Martin Shkreli being permanently banned from Twitter, and an article from the Australian’s Herald Sun from June 2016 about the age of an Australian NBA player. Other affected sites including Voxthe MirrorRolling StoneBusiness Insider AustraliaNewsweek, Kotaku, Vanity Fair, and most disturbingly, Teen Vogue.

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NY Times blasted for sick defense of ‘pornography literacy’ for first graders

The New York Times, a “woke” newspaper, has come to the defense of a radical feminist and social justice warrior who teaches “pornography literacy classes” to little children.

Justine Ang Fonte, who describes herself on LinkedIn as an “intersectional health educator fighting for a more sex-positive world,” provoked outrage among parents of children at an elite Manhattan private school when the New York Post revealed that she was teaching their kids about masturbation and porn.

The lessons on porn reportedly included an overview of porn genres, including “incest-themed,” “barely legal,” “kink” and “BDSM,” and a look at the most searched pornographic terms of 2019, including “creampie,” “anal,” “gangbang” and “stepmom.”

The lesson on masturbation, meanwhile, included a disturbing cartoon showing little children talking among themselves about “touching themselves” for pleasure.

The outrage that ensued following the publication of the Post’s report led to Fonte resigning in disgrace early last month.

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Utah Passes Law Requiring Porn to Be Blocked on All Cellphones, Tablets in the State

The free thinking argument, that blows away the notion of illegal prostitution, is that of pornography. Pornography, or porn, is nothing more than prostitution that has been state-sanctioned, taxed, filmed, and distributed. However, because it is taxed — politicians have generally left it alone — until now. Utah Governor Spencer Cox signed a bill Tuesday that calls for all smartphones and tablets sold in the Beehive State to have adult content filters.

If one is truly for freedom, outlawing consensual acts between adults should be resisted — even if these acts involve the swapping of bodily fluids. And, although the state claims the right to kidnap and cage people for engaging in these consensual acts, it does not mean they are somehow immoral.

The Free Thought Project has long objected to the prohibition of sex work as it creates crime, sends sex workers into dangerous situations, and outlaws one of the oldest professions in the world. While the prohibition of sex work is bad enough, the governor of Utah passing a law that will filter out legal pornography on all tablets and smartphones sold in the state is outright tyrannical.

If someone wishes to access porn on their device, they must first get permission from their cellphone provider and they will be put on a list of people allowed to view porn.

According to House Bill 72, the so-called filter would “prevent the user of the device from accessing material that is harmful to minors on the device; enable certain users to deactivate the filter for the device or for specific content; and notify the user when content is filtered.”

Cox said the move would send an “important message” about preventing children from accessing explicit content on the Web.

“We really want to empower parents,” Cox said. “If nothing else it sends an important message.”

But blocking pornography on 100 percent of devices in the state does absolutely nothing to “empower parents.” There are already programs and filters available to empower parents to block porn on devices and they are free. All this law does, as the ACLU of Utah put it “infringes upon the general public’s First Amendment rights to freely access the internet.”

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The War on Porn Is Back

“If you want better men by any standard, there is every reason to regard ubiquitous pornography as an obstacle,” declared New York Times columnist Ross Douthat in a 2018 column bluntly headlined “Let’s Ban Porn.”

In this, as in many things, Douthat was ahead of the conservative intellectual curve by a year or two. And in this, as in many things, he was dangerously wrong.

In due course, Douthat has been joined by the folks at the Christian journal First Things, who have taken up the anti-pornography banner as part of their peculiar subvariant of a resurgent interest in nationalism among traditionalist conservatives. In last year’s manifesto, “Against the Dead Consensus,” a clutch of First Things friends and familiars reject “economic libertarianism” and “the soulless society of individual affluence” and add that they “respectfully decline to join with those who would resurrect warmed-over Reaganism.” Which makes it all the more disconcerting when they turn around and immediately kneel before the scolding ghost of Ed Meese.

As attorney general, Meese sought to deliver on Reagan’s 1987 threat to “purveyors” of obscene material that the “industry’s days are numbered.” It was Meese who pulled together the first National Obscenity Enforcement Unit. (One surprising and familiar name also crops up in the tale: then–assistant attorney general and recent Libertarian Party vice presidential pick William F. Weld, who was given the task of bringing together various agencies for the task force.)

Meese’s bill of grievances against the relatively constrained pornography of his day—which he credited in a speech to a report from a federal Commission on Pornography convened the previous year—will sound alarmingly familiar to readers of Douthat and First Things. He asserts “that violence, far from being an altogether separate category of pornography, is involved with almost all of it; that there are empirically verifiable connections between pornography and violent sex-related crimes; that the pornography industry is a brutal one that exploits and often ruins the lives of its ‘performers’ as well as its consumers, and that the ‘performers’ often include abused children and people plied with hard drugs; that whether or not it is directly imitated by those who consume it, pornography has a deleterious effect on what its consumers view as normal and healthy.”

The effort was, in some sense, successful. By 1990, the Department of Justice had managed to use obscenity statutes to force seven national porn distributors out of business. But the decades that followed were boom times for porn as the industry moved into new forms of distribution, so the success was far from permanent.

In a rare moment of sanity in 2011, the Justice Department shuttered what had come to be known as the Obscenity Prosecution Task Force, resulting in the delightful Politico headline “Holder accused of neglecting porn” and a harrumph from peeved conservatives, who vowed to reverse the Obama administration’s decision as soon as they could.

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