FAA directs UFO spotters to call Washington

Official FAA policy directs air traffic controllers wishing to report a UFO sighting to call the state of Washington, specifically the National UFO Reporting Center in Davenport.

Since 1974, the Center has fielded nearly 140,000 reports of UFO sightings from all of North America and overseas. On average, 15 sightings per day have been recorded for more than 20 years, nearly 7,000 from the Evergreen State.

Washington has the highest ratio of UFO sightings in the nation by population with 88 sightings per 100,000 residents. The earliest reports from Washingtonians date back some 70 years.

“It seems as though they started in 1945 over Hanford where they appeared over our nuclear facilities,” said Maurene Morgan of Port Townsend, according to The Leader. Morgan is state director for the Mutual UFO Network.

FAA “Order JO 7110.65Z – Air Traffic Control,” dictates procedures for the nation’s air traffic controllers. Chapter 9, Section 8 defines the procedure for reporting a UFO sighting: “Persons wanting to report UFO/unexplained phenomena activity should contact a UFO/ unexplained phenomena reporting data collection center, such as the National UFO Reporting Center, etc.”

The rule, which has an effective date of June 17, 2021, adds that if there’s any danger to life or property, the controller should call the police instead.

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FAA Issues ‘Mysterious’ Order to Ground Air Traffic Over ‘National Security Threat’

Air traffic was grounded Monday in parts of the U.S. west coast and Hawaii, but explanations are vague, leading the website The Drive to call the incident a “Mysterious Air Traffic Halt” that “Leaves More Questions Than Answers.”

The facts of the matter are clear: At about 5:30 p.m. Eastern time Monday, what’s known as a ground stop was issued that stopped planes from taking off and had air traffic controllers calling for airborne plans to land. The ground stop lasted for five to 10 minutes.

Things start getting murky quickly, however.

A spokesman for the San Diego International Airport told CNN the airport “was instructed by Air Traffic Control that there was a national ground stop but shortly after [5-7 minutes] our operations team was told it was lifted.”

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The FAA accidentally disclosed more than 2,000 flight records associated with Jeffrey Epstein’s private jets

In January 2020, Insider asked the Federal Aviation Administration for all the agency’s flight records, including departure and arrival data, associated with a fleet of private jets owned by Jeffrey Epstein. Filed under the Freedom of Information Act, our request seemed to have a decent chance of success: The agency in 2011 released its entire database of US-based flights to The Wall Street Journal.

In March 2020, however, the FAA denied our request, saying that “the responsive records originate from an investigative file” and were therefore exempt from disclosure. The agency cited Exemption 7(A), which Congress designed to shield records that were “compiled for law enforcement” and “could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceeding.” The FAA did not specify which enforcement proceeding the records might interfere with; Ghislaine Maxwell, Epstein’s ex-girlfriend and confidante, faces a trial over sex-trafficking charges this month.

But despite its original denial, the FAA inadvertently mailed Insider a portion of Epstein’s flight records alongside correspondence for an unrelated FOIA request earlier this year. The records contained data on 2,300 flights among four private jets registered to Epstein between 1998 and 2020. Most of them had appeared in Insider’s searchable database of all known flights connected to Epstein.

The new FAA records also reveal 704 previously unknown flights taken by Epstein’s planes. These include hundreds of trips from a three-year gap in the public record, from 2013 to 2016, when the jets’ movements were unaccounted for.

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Media Outlet Files Lawsuit to Challenge FAA Ban on Drone Footage at Texas Border

A media outlet has filed a lawsuit in response to the Biden administration’s attempt to censor coverage of the 10,000-plus strong Haitian migrant army amassing under the Del Rio International Bridge by banning drones from flying over the area.

After Fox News, Infowars and other media outlets captured shocking footage of the huge mass of migrants, the FAA issued new flight restrictions banning the flight of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), a clear attempt to help the White House cover-up what’s really going on and control the narrative.

The lawsuit, filed by Free Speech Systems, argues that the federal government’s shut down of drone coverage “serves no other purpose than to hamper the efforts of the press in covering the unfolding crisis, in violation of Free Speech Systems’ First Amendment rights and should not stand.”

“Because of the significant number and the remote location of the migrants, it is difficult for the press to photograph the mass of migrants with traditional means, which renders the press unable to fully express the scope of the crisis in visual format, which is a critical component of the news stories that are being covered on the ground,” argues the lawsuit.

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The Strangest Encounters With Unidentified Aircraft We’ve Found In The FAA’s Huge Database

The War Zone has begun to analyze some of the thousands of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) drone and unidentified aircraft incident reports collected in our new mapping tool. Several of these reports describe incidents that have been featured in our previous stories, including one that showcased nearly two dozen unusual incidents involving military aircraft or training ranges. However, many of them have provided leads on new and highly unusual incidents, ranging from puzzling high altitude encounters to craft described as cylinders and even discs.

As might be expected, the degree of severity of the incidents in the data set varies dramatically. Many of the reports describe common but nonetheless concerning safety hazards posed by errant recreational drones flown at low altitudes. Buried within the reports are also much more concerning incidents involving aircraft operating near sensitive facilities, such as nuclear installations and military bases, or at highly peculiar, and illegal, altitudes. The reports also vary considerably in terms of the type of aircraft described. Beyond the expected menagerie of commercial and recreational drones, a number of unusual vehicles are mentioned, including some balloon-drone hybrids, and a small smattering of references to what pilots described as UFOs.

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