CIA launches a podcast, hoping to ‘demystify’ the agency and boost recruitment

There is no shortage of podcasts out there exploring the mechanics of espionage, celebrating fictionalized spies and detailing the real-world exploits of the country’s premiere intelligence agency. But only one, as of today, is officially unclassified.

The CIA launched ‘The Langley Files’ podcast on Thursday, attempting to step out from its own shadows to share stories from the agency’s 75-year history — and provide a little insight into what it takes to work there.

The goal of the podcast, according to a CIA spokesperson, is to provide a bit more transparency into an agency premised on secrecy.

‘“The Langley Files’ is a major milestone for CIA as the agency marks its 75th anniversary,” said CIA press secretary Susan Miller. “It is the latest in CIA’s ongoing efforts to be as open as possible with the public, sharing what we can about our mission, people, and history.”

And in telling stories on the history of the CIA — featuring senior CIA officials, agency historians and CIA museum experts as guests — the agency hopes to attract new interest from a young generation of potential recruits.

“We want to reach a wider and more diverse audience than ever before, so that people who might not have thought of joining CIA — or might not have known that there could be a place for their talents here — consider CIA in their career plans,” a CIA spokesperson said.

“The podcast supports the agency’s efforts to connect with talent from all backgrounds and walks of life,” the spokesperson continued. “To be successful in its national security mission, CIA needs to build the diverse, skilled workforce of tomorrow, and we hope ‘The Langley Files’ can serve as a way to reach those candidates.”

The podcast will be hosted by two agency officers, exploring new topics with special guests in each episode.

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There’s a conspiracy theory that the CIA invented the term ‘conspiracy theory’ – here’s why

Conspiracy theories have a long history, but the actual term “conspiracy theory” emerged much more recently. It was only a few decades ago that the term took on the derogatory connotations it has today, where to call someone a conspiracy theorist functions as an insult.

So it may come as no surprise that there is even a conspiracy theory about the origins of the label. This conspiracy theory claims that the CIA invented the term in 1967 to disqualify those who questioned the official version of John F Kennedy’s assassination and doubted that his killer, Lee Harvey Oswald, had acted alone.

There are even two versions of this conspiracy theory. The more extreme version claims that the CIA literally invented the term in the sense that the words “conspiracy” and “theory” had never been used before in combination. A more moderate version acknowledges that the term existed before, but claims that the CIA intentionally created its negative connotations and so turned the label into a tool of political propaganda.

The more moderate version has been particularly popular in recent years for two reasons. First, it is very easy to disprove the more extreme claim that the CIA actually invented the term. As a search on Google Books quickly reveals, the term “conspiracy theory” emerged around 1870 and began to be more frequently used during the 1950s. Even die-hard conspiracy theorists have a hard time trying to ignore this. Second, the more moderate version received a big boost in popularity a few years ago when American political scientist Lance DeHaven-Smith propagated it in a book published by a renowned university press.

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Senate doesn’t have to release full CIA torture report, judge rules

The U.S. Senate does not have to release its full report detailing the Central Intelligence Agency’s interrogation and detention program following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, a federal judge ruled Thursday.

Journalist Shawn Musgrave sought the 6,700-page document, citing a “common law right of access” to public records. The legal argument is conceptually similar to the Freedom of Information Act. Congress is not subject to the Freedom of Information Act, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled in 2016 that the report was a congressional record. Musgrave’s legal argument was made in an attempt to get around that limitation.

Common law right of access is decided in the District of Columbia Circuit based on a two-part test that requires a determination that the document is a public record and then balancing the government’s interest in keeping the document secret against the public’s interest in disclosure.

District of Columbia District Judge Beryl Howell ruled that the report “does not qualify as a public record subject to the common law right of public access” because although it was part of the committee’s investigation, it was aimed at gathering information and did not make recommendations or propose legislation. Therefore, she said, it falls under the protections of the 1st Amendment‘s speech and debate clause protecting legislators’ speech while crafting legislation.

The government interest in keeping the information secret outweighs public interest, Howell wrote.

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Former CIA Station Chief: Intelligence Agencies Cannot ‘Be Reformed’ Unless POTUS Can ‘Fire Every Federal Employee’

Former CIA officer and station chief Scott Uehlinger told Breitbart News on Thursday that intelligence agencies cannot be cleansed of political and partisan corruption unless the president has the unitary power over the federal government’s personnel decisions.

Uehlinger discussed left-wing and partisan politicization of federal intelligence agencies on Thursday’s edition of SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Daily with special guest host and retired Navy SEAL and FBI agent Jonathan Gilliam.

“It’s a real cause of concern, not just among regular folks, but [among] people who served in these agencies,” he stated. He emphasized the ubiquity of such political orientations among intelligence agency employees.

He remarked, “The infection in these organizations is not just the political appointees. It’s basically everyone from mid-grade-level and up, if not lower because they’re all the recipients of a super-liberal education.”

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George H.W. Bush, the CIA, and the Pennington Ruse

Officially, George H.W. Bush’s association with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) began with his appointment to the post of Director of Central Intelligence by then President and former Warren Commission member Gerald Ford. However, speculation persists that Bush’s relationship with the Agency began long before his tenure as DCI.

How a politician with no known background in intelligence was able to ascend to the top post of a famously insular and opaque organization remains unclear. According to the CIA’s internal history, Bush was selected as an outsider to improve both morale and the Agency’s relationship with Congress.

However, evidence exists which points to a connection between George Bush and the CIA long before his assent to the Agency’s top post.

After the assassination of President Kennedy in November 1963, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover reported in a memo to the State Department that he had verbally briefed a man named George Bush of the CIA on the reaction to President Kennedy’s death in the Cuban exile community.

During this time in Bush’s career, he was in charge of Zapata Offshore Company in Houston, Texas. When The Nation first published evidence of Bush’s involvement with the Agency in 1988, reporter Joseph McBride alleged that Bush’s position at the oil company was a cover for clandestine operations. McBride cited a November 29, 1963 memo from J. Edgar Hoover saying Bush “started working for the Agency in 1960 or 1961, using his oil business as a cover for clandestine activities.”

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CIA Helps Ukraine Compile “Death List” Website

History reveals the CIA has an affinity for death lists. In 1990, The Washington Post reported the agency “supplied the names of thousands of members of the Indonesian Communist Party to the army in Jakarta, which at the time was hunting down the leftists and killing them in a crackdown branded as one of the century’s worst massacres” in 1965.

The late investigative journalist, William Blum, wrote in his book “Killing Hope,” that the CIA has assassinated or attempted to assassinate leaders in China, India, Panama, Zaire (then the Congo), Haiti, Cuba, and numerous other countries. (See “The CIA’s Greatest Hits – US Government Assassinations”).

Thus it makes perfect sense the CIA would be involved in compiling a list of “terrorists” for the SBU (Security Service of Ukraine) to eliminate. As Max Blumenthal recently tweeted, the Ukrainian Myrotvorets website lists “Langley, VA, USA” as a partner in the effort to track down dissidents and murder them. Langley is the hometown of the CIA.

Note: if you are upset by dead and mutilated bodies, do not visit the website. The front page, above the fold, displays dead Russian soldiers.

According to Whois, an internet domain lookup, the site is registered to OroCommerce, a “digital commerce solutions” company. The OroCommerce website’s front page mentions the Ukraine specifically. It features a “Donate Now” button for something called the “Stand with Ukraine” fund.

The StandWithUkraine website, like much of the corporate media, puts forward a number of lies and falsifications to justify its existence in supporting the Ukraine. The opening paragraph:

“On Feb. 24, 2022 Russia declared an unprovoked war on Ukraine and launched a full-scale invasion. Russia is currently bombing peaceful Ukrainian cities, including schools and hospitals and attacking civilians who are fleeing conflict zones.”

YouTube is replete with interviews of Ukrainians escaping the violence (most are now deplatformed). Invariably, they claim the UAF (Ukrainian Armed Forces), in particular its neo-Nazi contingents, have fired upon them as they attempted to escape the fighting. The truth is the opposite of what is claimed by StandWithUkraine and the western corporate media. The UAF has occupied hospitals and schools and used them as firing positions.

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Marine wounded in Kabul suicide attack claims CIA WARNED them about bomber, watched him for two days and were told not to kill him in horrifying account of the blast that killed 13 US service members and hundreds of Afghans

Marines stationed at Kabul airport’s Abbey Gate last year were give a description by the CIA of a suicide bomber two days before an explosion ripped through the chaotic evacuation, according to one of the troops wounded in the blast. 

They spotted him observing their position but were denied permission when they asked to open fire on him.

Thirteen U.S. service personnel and at least 170 Afghans died on August 26, 2021, when the Islamic State bomber detonated his explosives. 

Tristan Hirsch was a U.S. Marine stationed at the gate at the heart of the chaos.

He survived the blast and has since left military life, allowing him the freedom to describe the events leading up to the attack.

He described Taliban executions in the crush of people trying to escape, the presence of a second suicide bomber and claimed Marines had seen the first bomber in the area for two days – but were not allowed to kill him.

‘We knew about him two days prior to the attack,’ Hirsch, 24, told his local newspaper in California, the Chico Enterprise-Record.

‘We knew what he looked like. The CIA let us know; he looked exactly as they’d described him.’

They had been told that a man on a suicide mission, and preparing for heaven, would look different to the tired, hungry hordes who were besieging the airport looking for help to get out. They were on the look out for someone looking freshly showered with a well-trimmed beard. 

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HOW ONE SPOOK-RUN LONDON COLLEGE DEPARTMENT IS TRAINING THE WORLD’S SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGERS

Staffed by NATO military officers and former government ministers and notorious for training the West’s top spies, the Department of War Studies at King’s College London is also providing the workforce for many of the largest social media companies. This includes Facebook, TikTok, Google, and Twitter.

MintPress study of professional databases and employment websites reveals a wide network of War Studies alumni holding many of the most influential jobs in media, constituting a silent army of individuals who influence what the world sees (and does not see) in its social media feeds.

Set in an imposing building near the banks of the River Thames in Central London, the Department of War Studies is at the heart of the British establishment. Current staff includes the former Secretary General of NATO, former U.K. Minister of Defense, and a host of military officers from NATO and NATO-aligned countries.

It is also a favored training ground for the secret services. A 2009 report published by the CIA described how beneficial it is to “use universities as a means of intelligence training,” writing that “exposure to an academic environment, such as the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, can add several elements that may be harder to provide within the government system,” also mentioning that the department’s faculty have “extensive and well-rounded intelligence experience.”

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