Counselor For Sex Offenders Defends “Minor-Attracted Persons”

A counselor for sex offenders who works with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections has stoked controversy after defending “minor attracted persons” and comparing pedophilia to a normal sexual preference.

In a video posted to YouTube that has since been clipped and posted to Twitter, Miranda Galbreath describes adults who are sexually attracted to children as “probably the most vilified population of folks in our culture.”

“The term pedophile has moved from being a diagnostic label to being a judgmental, hurtful insult that we hurl at people in order to harm them or slander them,” Galbreath insisted.

“I also like to use person-first language that recognizes that any label we apply to a person is only part of who they are and doesn’t represent everything that they are,” she added.

Asserting that “many minor-attracted persons never act on their attraction,” Galbreath complained that saying mean things about would-be child molesters is harmful to an “already marginalized population.”

Galbreath sought to remove agency from pedophiles, suggesting that their sickness isn’t their own fault and that their sexual perversions should be accepted on the same level as heterosexuality or homosexuality.

“[Minor-attracted person] simply means that the person has an enduring sexual or romantic attraction to minors. They have not chosen this attraction, just as the rest of us have not chosen whatever our attraction is,” Galbreath said.

“You don’t get to choose to be heterosexual or to be gay or whatever you are, and you don’t get to choose to be a minor-attracted person,” she added.

According to Galbreath’s website, she has 20 years of experience working in the mental health field and also conducts “evaluation and treatment services in the community and within state prisons to folks who have committed sexual offenses,” including for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections.

The video clip is yet another illustration of the end game of sexual progressivism – the absorption of pedophilia under the LGBTQ+ umbrella.

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‘Genderfluid’ ‘Puppy’ Begins Work at Department of Energy

Back in the days of Roman imperial decadence, at least according to legend, the emperor Caligula demonstrated his unfitness for office and the dangers of public indifference and complacency when he appointed his horse Incitatus a senator. Woke America hasn’t reached such an advanced stage of imperial decadence that we have a horse in the Senate; all we have is a dog in the Department of Energy.

Sam Brinton (“they/them”) tweeted happily on Wednesday: “It’s official. As of June 19th, I now serve my nation as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the Office of Nuclear Energy in the Department of Energy.” He attached a photo of himself that was apparently taken in his office; in it, a smirking, lipsticked Brinton, hands on hips, is wearing a belted sleeveless red jumpsuit (or something) with American flag-themed high heels and a chain necklace.

Brinton modestly omits mention of the fact that he is the first canine to serve in the Department of Energy. In a 2016 article in Metro Weekly, he speaks at length about “puppy play” (he is identified only by his first name, but an accompanying photo makes it clear that Sam in the article is Brinton. The new Deputy Assistant Secretary explains: “I actually have trouble when we transition from pup play to having sex. Like, ‘No, I can’t have you whimper like that when we’re having sex,’ because I don’t want to mix that world. It’s interesting, because he doesn’t have to come out of pup mode to have me f**k him. I personally have to bring him out of pup perception for me. But then I’m still treating him as a submissive to me.”

The nuclear energy expert defends all this against those strait-laced bigots who might object: “I’ve honestly had people ask, ‘Wait, you have sex with animals?’ They believe it’s abusive, that it’s taking advantage of someone who may not be acting up to a level of human responsibility…. The other misperception is that I have some really messed up background, like, did I have some horrible childhood trauma that made me like to have sex with animals.”

He may not have mentioned all this Wednesday because, in typical Leftist fashion, he claims that an earlier announcement of his appointment had led to him receiving threats. It’s funny how Leftists are responsible for the overwhelming majority of the political violence in America today, yet Leftist politicians and officials routinely claim that they’re constantly being harassed by racist, redneck, MAGA hat-wearing yahoos. Brinton tweeted: “Due to the concern of negative and threatening responses like we saw in my previous announcement, including more than a hundred death threats and more vitriol than I could have imagined, I held off announcing my official start until I could be safe and secure in my new role.”

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Psychedelics: How They Act On The Brain To Relieve Depression

Up to 30% of people with depression don’t respond to treatment with antidepressants. This may be down to differences in biology between patients and the fact that it often takes a long time to respond to the drugs – with some people giving up after a while. So there is an urgent need to expand the repertoire of drugs available to people with depression.

In recent years, attention has turned to psychedelics such as psilocybin, the active compound in “magic mushrooms”. Despite a number of clinical trials showing that psilocybin can rapidly treat depression, including for cancer-related anxiety and depression, little is known about how psilocybin actually works to relieve depression in the brain.

Now two recent studies, published in The New England Journal of Medicine and Nature Medicine, have shed some light on this mysterious process.

Psilocybin is a hallucinogen that changes the brain’s response to a chemical called serotonin. When broken down by the liver (into “psilocin”), it causes an altered state of consciousness and perception in users.

Previous studies, using functional MRI (fMRI) brain scanning, have shown that psilocybin seems to reduce activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain that helps regulate a number of cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habits and memory. The compound also decreases connections between this area and the posterior cingulate cortex, an area that may play a role in regulating memory and emotions.

An active connection between these two brain areas is normally a feature of the brain’s “default mode network”. This network is active when we rest and focus internally, perhaps reminiscing about the past, envisioning the future or thinking about ourselves or others. By reducing the activity of the network, psilocybin may well be removing the constraints of the internal “self” – with users reporting an “opened mind” with increased perception of the world around them.

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New AI Detects Mental Disorders Based On Web Posts

Dartmouth researchers have built an artificial intelligence model for detecting mental disorders using conversations on Reddit, part of an emerging wave of screening tools that use computers to analyze social media posts and gain an insight into people’s mental states.

What sets the new model apart is a focus on the emotions rather than the specific content of the social media texts being analyzed. In a paper presented at the 20th International Conference on Web Intelligence and Intelligent Agent Technology, the researchers show that this approach performs better over time, irrespective of the topics discussed in the posts.

There are many reasons why people don’t seek help for mental health disorders—stigma, high costs, and lack of access to services are some common barriers. There is also a tendency to minimize signs of mental disorders or conflate them with stress, says Xiaobo Guo, Guarini ’24, a co-author of the paper. It’s possible that they will seek help with some prompting, he says, and that’s where digital screening tools can make a difference.

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Inside dangerous ‘Nullo’ craze where sick ‘cutters’ castrate wannabe eunuchs on film and keep privates in freezer to EAT

WHEN Japanese artist Mao Sugiyama had his privates sliced off and served to diners for £160 a head, he became the highest profile member of a small but growing band of ‘nullos’.

The bizarre act is thought to have inspired members of a nullos movement arrested this week in North London under suspicion of carrying out illegal castrations and streaming the ops online.

The seven men, between the ages of 30 and 60, allegedly carried out amputations in a basement flat in Finsbury Park and filmed the procedures for a pay-per-view channel promoted on Twitter. 

The group’s leader, who was arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm, was said to call himself the Eunuch Maker.

It’s a shocking example of a global subculture which is growing in popularity, and encouraging amateur surgeons – known as cutters – to carry out illegal operations, often with disastrous results.

In some extreme cases, Nullos – short for genital nullification or voluntary eunuchs – have even shown cannibalistic tendencies, keeping the lopped off body parts in the freezer to eat.

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‘Mass Formation Psychosis’ — It’s Real, and It Was Purposely Caused by Biden and the Democrat Party

“Mass formation psychosis.”

No, it doesn’t refer to a screwed-up flock of geese flying south for the winter.

In a Christmas Day article titled COVID Has Been Overtaken by a Secondary Pandemic—and It’s Real, I discussed Illness Anxiety Disorder, or “health anxiety.” Specifically COVID-related Illness Anxiety Disorder. As defined by Mayo Clinic, Illness Anxiety, in part, is needlessly worrying about becoming seriously ill.

Illness Anxiety Disorder, sometimes called hypochondriasis or health anxiety, is worrying excessively that you are or may become seriously ill.

You may have no physical symptoms.

Or you may believe that normal body sensations or minor symptoms are signs of severe illness, even though a thorough medical exam doesn’t reveal a serious medical condition.

Mass Formation Psychosis, or “mass hypnosis” or “the madness of crowds,” as noted by TrialSiteNews, occurs when a large fraction of the population is completely unable to process new scientific data and facts, demonstrating that they have been misled or lied to.

In the case of COVID-19, the no-longer-pandemic, Anthony Fauci, Joe Biden, and the Democrat Party, and the Democrat state media — principally CNN and MSNBC — have consistently misled, changed their stories, or outright lied to America about the effectiveness and adverse impacts of mandatory mask use, lockdowns, and genetic vaccines that cause people’s bodies to make large amounts of biologically-active coronavirus spike protein.

Tens of millions of Americans, hypnotized by the left, have been and remain incapable of recognizing the lies and manipulation.

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CIA-backed secret experiments conducted on hundreds of Danish orphans – documentary

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) allegedly backed secret experiments into schizophrenia on 311 Danish children, many adopted or from orphanages, during the early 1960s, according to a newly released documentary.

Danish Radio’s documentary ‘The Search for Myself’ accuses the US spy agency of supporting the experiments at the Municipal Hospital in Cophenhagen. The studies were reportedly investigating the link between schizophrenia and heredity or the environment.

Per Wennick, who claims to have been a participant in the experiments as a child, alleged that he was placed in a chair, with electrodes strapped to him and forced to listen to loud, shrill noises. The aim of the test was supposedly to find out if a child had psychopathic traits.

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How COVID-19 Opened the Door to a New Era in Psychedelic Medicine

From Wall Street to Hollywood, psychedelics are having a cultural moment. For those of us who grew up in the “this is your brain on drugs” era, it’s hard to let go of stigma—and the mental image of an egg sizzling on a hot pan. But as a growing number of states and cities move to decriminalize drugs, and investors flock to an emerging market for psychedelic health care, substances like psilocybin, ketamine and LSD are edging into mainstream culture—and setting the stage for a paradigm shift in modern medicine.

Within the next few years, we could see psychedelic therapies prescribed for refractory depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or used in palliative care among those facing a life-limiting illness. But first we need to more deeply understand the benefits of psychedelic treatments. Right now, we are in the perfect storm to accelerate continued study—and health care workers are on the front lines.

It’s no coincidence that psychedelics are entering the conversation at the moment we most sorely need new ideas in mental health care. The world is experiencing mass trauma from COVID-19. It’ll take years for us to truly understand the magnitude of the pandemic’s toll on our collective mental health, but on the front lines, the picture is much clearer. In a recent survey of more than 20,000 frontline medical workers, 38% reported experiencing anxiety or depression during the pandemic, and 49% suffered burnout. Another survey found nearly one-quarter of all health care workers showed signs of probable PTSD.

When the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses surveyed 6,000 of their members this year, 66% said they had considered leaving their jobs because of the pandemic. “No amount of money could convince me to stay on as a bedside ICU nurse right now,” a Seattle-area nurse wrote in a resignation note posted on Twitter. “I can’t continue to live with the toll on my body and mind. Even weekly therapy has not been enough to dilute the horrors I carry with me from this past year and a half.”

Among health care workers, the prolonged battle against COVID-19 has intensified a long smoldering problem. Facing a fragmented medical sytem with frequently misaligned incentives, health care workers have been grappling with anxiety and depression—even before COVID, the suicide rate among doctors was more than twice that of the general public. From support groups and training to apps that monitor mental health, there are a number of programs that aim to solve and treat the problems leading to clinician burnout. But most have barely scratched the surface, and the prevalence of burnout during the pandemic has led researchers to explore alternative solutions—including psychedelic therapies.

A new study at the University of Washington is evaluating the efficacy of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy using psilocybin for frontline health care workers experiencing COVID-related distress. “The situations that frontline doctors and nurses are facing is unprecedented,” says Dr. Anthony Back, who’s leading the study. “The symptoms of depression, burnout and moral injury call out for research that looks at whether psychedelics can play a role in healing the healers.” The U.S. is not alone in seeking alternative therapies for the growing number of health care workers in crisis: at Vancouver Island University in Canada, the Roots to Thrive ketamine-assisted therapy program treats health care providers and first responders with PTSD, depression, anxiety and addiction.

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