Tim Ryan Says Americans Need To Give Up Gas Cars as He Drives Around Ohio in Gas Guzzlers

Rep. Tim Ryan (D., Ohio) says the United States is ready to ban gas cars, arguing in 2019 that socialist Bernie Sanders’s plan to ban gas vehicles wasn’t ambitious enough. On the Senate campaign trail, Ryan is sticking to gas guzzlers.

Ryan’s first Senate campaign ad features him riding around with his son in a 2020 GMC Yukon, which gets roughly 14 to 15 miles per gallon around town. When leaving a campaign stop in Zanesville, Ohio, last month, Ryan boarded a 15-mile-per-gallon Chevrolet Tahoe.

Sometimes Ryan prefers his comparatively eco-friendly 2020 GMC Sierra, a truck, which gets around 23 miles per gallon. GMC does make an electric truck, the Hummer EV, which can get around 350 miles on a single battery charge, but it will set consumers back nearly $110,000.

“Tim loves his UAW-built American-made Tahoe,” Ryan campaign spokeswoman Izzi Levy told the Washington Free Beacon, “and wouldn’t trade it for anything—not even the $70,000 BMW that chauffeurs J.D. Vance around Ohio.”

The debate over how much the United States should embrace electric cars has been a flashpoint in Ohio’s Senate race, in which Ryan is facing off against Republican J.D. Vance. Although Ryan is a rubber stamp for President Joe Biden’s green agenda, which has poured hundreds of billions of dollars into renewable energy initiatives, he has remained mum on how much the federal government should be regulating what cars Americans drive.

“When Tim Ryan ran for president, he fully embraced banning gas-powered vehicles and said that Bernie Sanders’s climate change plan didn’t go far enough,” a spokesman for the Vance campaign told the Free Beacon. “Now that he is running for Senate in Ohio, he’s doing everything he can to run away from those radical, far-left positions. Simply put, Tim Ryan will say whatever it takes to get elected and then sell out working-class Ohioans at the first chance he gets.”

Ryan, who votes 100 percent of the time with President Joe Biden, has championed the Democratic Party’s green push. A campaign spokeswoman told a local outlet earlier this month that the “auto industry is quickly moving toward electric vehicles.” After Ryan voted for Biden’s infrastructure bill in February, the congressman’s office released a statement applauding provisions for, among other things, an “equitable network of chargers” for electric cars.

That money for green infrastructure is not much immediate help for Ohio voters. In the last week alone, gas prices there have spiked 10 cents per gallon, according to AAA.

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Millions Of Electric Car Batteries Retiring By 2030, Are We Ready To Deal With What Could Be Ticking Time Bombs?

The evolving landscape of lithium batteries is creating both contradictions and infrastructure hurdles that, according to some, need to be addressed sooner rather than later. A critical component of this is waste management.

More than 6 million electric vehicle (EV) battery packs will end up as scrap between now and 2030, and the recycling and reuse industries are racing to keep up. Some researchers project that recycling alone will be an over $12 billion industry by 2025.

U.S. President Joe Biden wants to make America a key player in the EV battery industry with a $3.1 billion spending package for automobile production to transition away from fossil fuels.

Much of this dream is pinned on a dusty stretch of soil in the Nevada high desert called Thacker Pass. It serves as the lynchpin in Biden’s push for increased domestic lithium production and more EV batteries. That’s because Thacker Pass is the largest hard rock lithium reserve in the United States.

Currently, China dominates the world’s EV battery production, with more than 80 percent of all units developed there.

Yet while Biden’s administration has its sights on the top spot for EV battery production, insiders are pointing out industry trapdoors.

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California Tells Residents Not To Charge EV Because Of Blackouts A Week After Saying State Would Ban Sale Of Gas Cars

California residents are being told not to charge their electric vehicles due to possible blackouts just one week after the state announced it would ban the sale of gas-powered cars in 2035.

The state issued a heat advisory Tuesday, warning excessive heat “will stress [the] energy grid.”

“Consumers are urged to reduce energy use from 4-9 p.m. when the system is most stressed because demand for electricity remains high and there is less solar energy available,” the state said in the notice. “The top three conservation actions are to set thermostats to 78 degrees or higher, avoid using large appliances and charging electric vehicles, and turn off unnecessary lights.”

The state of California earlier in August banned the sale of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035 as it tries to transition toward electric vehicles. The state also set interim targets, requiring 35% of vehicles sold in the state by 2026 to produce zero emissions, increasing to 68% by 2030. California is the nation’s largest auto market.

But the new electric vehicle mandates may be “extremely challenging” to meet, President of the Alliance for Automotive Innovation John Bozzella told The New York Times in an email.

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The U.S. made a breakthrough battery discovery — then gave the technology to China

When a group of engineers and researchers gathered in a warehouse in Mukilteo, Wash., 10 years ago, they knew they were onto something big. They scrounged up tables and chairs, cleared out space in the parking lot for experiments and got to work.

They were building a battery — a vanadium redox flow battery — based on a design created by two dozen U.S. scientists at a government lab. The batteries were about the size of a refrigerator, held enough energy to power a house, and could be used for decades. The engineers pictured people plunking them down next to their air conditioners, attaching solar panels to them, and everyone living happily ever after off the grid.

“It was beyond promise,” said Chris Howard, one of the engineers who worked there for a U.S. company called UniEnergy. “We were seeing it functioning as designed, as expected.”

But that’s not what happened. Instead of the batteries becoming the next great American success story, the warehouse is now shuttered and empty. All the employees who worked there were laid off. And more than 5,200 miles away, a Chinese company is hard at work making the batteries in Dalian, China.

The Chinese company didn’t steal this technology. It was given to them — by the U.S. Department of Energy. First in 2017, as part of a sublicense, and later, in 2021, as part of a license transfer. An investigation by NPR and the Northwest News Network found the federal agency allowed the technology and jobs to move overseas, violating its own licensing rules while failing to intervene on behalf of U.S. workers in multiple instances.

Now, China has forged ahead, investing millions into the cutting-edge green technology that was supposed to help keep the U.S. and its economy out front.

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Biden demanding remote kill switch for your new car

The federal gov’t and silicon valley are looking to clamp down on your freedom of movement. Your ability to move about as you please does not fit with their goals for the future of our world. Automotive-related freedoms, including access to fuel, allow us to be free to move without the permission of silicon valley and the federal government. Automotive freedoms are not only hobby related; they are essential to preventing yet another step along the road to serfdom at the hands of woke corporations and federal bureaucrats.

Biden recently signed into law a requirement that all vehicles produced after 2026 be fitted with a remote kill switch. Electric vehicles are already equipped with this capability via internet-connected “superchargers.” These corporations can sell you a product for tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars, then prevent you from using them. Worse yet, if the law is not challenged or repealed, these kill switches will have a “back door” that allows government agencies to shut your vehicle off remotely as well.

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Washington State Is BANNING Non-Electric Cars by 2030

As 1984 gains a firmer grasp on the modern world, one recent bill has caused it to spread its reach even further: a bill inserted within Washington state’s $16.9 billion “Move Aside Ahead Washington” package. This new piece of paper, signed by Washington governor Jay Inslee on March 25, now makes it so that police will enforce all vehicles sold, purchased, or registered within the state to be electric vehicles by 2030.

Sec. 415. (1) A target is established for the state that all publicly owned and privately owned passenger and light-duty vehicles of model year 2030 or later that are sold, purchased, or registered in Washington state be electric vehicles.

(2) On or before December 31, 2023, the interagency electric vehicle coordinating council created in section 428 of this act shall complete a scoping plan for achieving the 2030 target.

According to Inslee, this bill will “create more efficient transportation options,” as he says that “Transportation is our state’s largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. There is no way to talk about climate change without talking about transportation.”

Inslee went on to add, “This package will move us away from the transportation system our grandparents imagined and towards the transportation system our grandchildren dream of.”

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