Biden’s DOJ Say Arsonist Who Killed A Man Should Get Reduced Sentence Because He Was Rioting For BLM

A BLM rioter who set fire to a pawn shop and killed a man is facing a shorter sentence than normal because, according to US Attorney W. Anders Folk, he was “caught up in the fury” of the Black Lives Matter riots.

On June 5, 2020, in Minnesota, BLM riots were breaking out and becoming violent. Hundreds of people took to the streets and began looting local businesses, vandalizing private property, and recklessly setting fire to buildings. Montez Terriel Lee Jr. was one of these violent actors.

That night, Lee broke into a pawn shop, poured fire accelerant around, and set it on fire. These actions were caught on video.

According to court records, one of the videos captures Lee standing in front of the burning shop, saying, “F*** this place. We’re gonna burn this b**** to the ground.”

Over two months after Lee burned down the shop, a 30-year-old man, Oscar Lee Stewart, was found dead among the debris.

By joining in the violence of the BLM riots and being misled into thinking that was the right way to act, Lee took the life of an innocent man that night.

The typical sentence that would be applied to Lee’s case is over 200 months of incarceration. However, in a memo from the US Attorney’s office for the District of Minnesota, a lesser sentence was recommended because of the “motives” behind Lee’s actions.

The memo describes Lee’s motives as almost admirable. Forgetting the violence he enacted and the innocent life he took, at least his intentions were “good”.

Mr. Lee’s motive for setting the fire is a foremost issue. Mr. Lee credibly states that he was in the streets to protest unlawful police violence against black men, and there is no basis to disbelieve this statement. Mr. Lee, appropriately, acknowledges that he “could have demonstrated in a different way,” but that he was “caught up in the fury of the mob after living as a black man watching his peers suffer at the hands of police.”

The defense that Lee was “caught up in the fury of the mob” is a poor way to set an example for the rest of the country. There needs to be some maintained sense of right and wrong. If you are upset and seeking social change, you shouldn’t be allowed to do so by burning cities and being violent. Generating fear and endangering others is not a reasonable way to get a point across.

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Biden Nominee Edited Radical Ecoterrorist Newsletter Advocating Violence Against Government Officials

Tracy Stone-Manning, President Joe Biden’s nominee to lead the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), helped edit a radical environmental newsletter that advocated for violent action and sought to further the mission of the extremist group Earth First!, whose members committed acts of ecoterrorism in the 1980s and 1990s.

Stone-Manning testified that she “helped edit” a local Earth First! newsletter called the Wild Rockies Review while she was a graduate student at the University of Montana in Missoula 30 years ago.

Though the editors and contributors of the Wild Rockies Review at that time frequently used pseudonyms or just last names to avoid legal consequences for their writings, multiple issues listed a “Stone” under “Assistance” on their mastheads. Stone-Manning went by “Tracy Stone” before she was married.

One such issue was the “Autumnal Equinox Issue,” labeled Vol. 1, No. 3. Also named under “Assistance” on that issue’s masthead was Stone-Manning’s classmate Bill Haskins, who was one of seven, including Stone-Manning, who were subpoenaed in 1989 over a tree spiking crime.

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Court Records Show Eco-Terrorist Letter Received by Forest Service Was Sent by Biden’s Bureau of Land Management Nominee

A past link to an activity described as eco-terrorism should disqualify President Joe Biden’s nominee to head the Bureau of Land Management, according to a Republican senator.

Sen. John Barrasso of Wyoming responded critically to nominee Tracy Stone-Manning’s role in sending a threatening letter on behalf of an environmentalist group that committed tree spiking crimes in 1989.

“Tracy Stone-Manning collaborated with eco-terrorists,” Barrasso said, according to the Daily Caller. “She worked with extreme environmental activists who spiked trees, threatening the lives and livelihoods of loggers.”

“While she was given immunity from prosecution to testify against her companions in court, her actions were disgraceful,” he said.

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BLM activist Bree Newsome calls for land reapportionment as part of reparations

Black Lives Matter leader Bree Newsome calls for reparations in the form of land reapportionment. She wrote on Twitter that crimes committed by the ancestors of white people should be paid by those descendants. Those who have benefited from the gains of white criminals past, she posits, should not be able to use those assets, if they are currently in possession of them.

“Amazing how white people commit atrocities in one generation & then they just disappear from existence,” she wrote. “No descendants, no names, no current wealth or land holdings that can be identified as a result of the atrocity.

“Only Black survivors exist with living memory apparently,” she wrote. The idea is that those who still have the land that belonged to their forefathers should relinquish it to the descendants of those who had been harmed by racist past practices. Newsome basically believes that children are responsible for the sins of their parents.

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Stop pretending the BLM protests were peaceful

Scan almost any of the popular media coverage over the past six weeks and you’ll find that journalists have been steadfast in their depiction of “protesters” as unassailably “peaceful.” While the vast majority of those who attended a state-backed demonstration or some other event spurred by the ‘movement’ are unlikely to have committed any acts of physical destruction, the term “peaceful protest” doesn’t seem to quite capture the impact of a society-wide upheaval that included, as a key component, mass riots — the magnitude of which have not been seen in the U.S. since at least the 1960s.

From large metro areas like Chicago and Minneapolis/St. Paul, to small and mid-sized cities like Fort Wayne, Indiana and Green Bay, Wisconsin, the number of boarded up, damaged or destroyed buildings I have personally observed — commercial, civic, and residential — is staggering. Keeping exact count is impossible. One might think that a major media organisation such as the New York Times would use some of their galactic journalistic resources to tally up the wreckage for posterity. But roughly six weeks later, and such a tally is still nowhere to be found.

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