Man Killed by Police, His Home Burned After SWAT Team Shows Up Over Tall Grass

Because the state claims the ability to tell you what you can and cannot do with your own property, often times, we see utterly ridiculous government overreach for simple issues like tall grass. In the land of the free, people have faced insane fines, been arrested, and have even had the state attempt to steal their entire home — over the length of their grass. Never, however, have we seen someone die because of it — until now.

This week, Austin police attempted to serve a warrant to man whose grass was too long. It resulted in a standoff, shots fired, a house fire, and that man’s death.

According to police, code enforcers showed up to his residence at 9:16 a.m. on Wednesday to serve the nuisance warrant over his tall grass. A grass cutting crew was with the government agents and they were prepared to forcibly mow the man’s grass.

But he never came to the door.

After their attempts to contact the man failed, city workers began mowing his grass. An hour later, shots rang out from inside his home.

“And they immediately backed off. They got all of the staff that was working on the house to safety and and a SWAT call was initiated for a barricaded subject,” Austin Police Chief Joseph Chacon said.

An area lockdown ensued after officers and a crisis negotiator attempted unsuccessfully to get the man to exit peacefully. An hours-long standoff ensued after their attempts failed.

“SWAT spent the next several hours trying to negotiate with the individual to just simply come out of the house,” Chacon said.

But the man did not come out. Instead, according to police, he began firing at officers so they sent in a SWAT robot.

At about 3 p.m., the resident started shooting at officers again. “And because of that immediate threat … they made entry using a robot,” Chacon said.

According to police, the robot determined that the man had started a fire inside but attempts to have him exit remained unsuccessful.

Finally, after flames began to engulf the home, according to police, the man came out of the garage “with weapons in his hand,” and “at that time, a SWAT officer shot and struck the resident who went down with a gunshot wound,” Chacon said.

Austin Police spokesperson Jose Mendez did not identify the man, who later died at the hospital. He only stated that he was a white man in his 50s.

“They attempted to cut the lawn for him, and this is the reaction they got,” Mendez said.

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80yo Army Vet Facing Fines, Jail for Butterfly Garden He Planted in His Front Yard

In the Land of the Free, as TFTP frequently reports, attempting to use your own property in a manner that suits you but not the government, can and will land you in hot water. Dennis Moriarty offered up his life to preserve the ostensible freedom in this land yet he is now finding out that “freedom” under tyranny is not freedom at all. His “crimes” in this new tyrannical world? Planting a flower garden in his own yard.

Moriarty, an 80-year-old Army veteran who loves butterflies, spends his days looking out from his porch into his 1,500 square foot garden in his front yard. He loves this garden as he’s spent countless hours planting native plants to attract butterflies.

The garden consists of milkweed, coneflowers, culver’s root, buttonbush, and other native flowers that aid in attracting bees and butterflies. As KansasCity.com points out, however, this beauty comes with a price — thanks to government.

“It’s not only gorgeous, but beneficial, using less water than conventional grass, for one thing. Yet the city has ordered him to either cut it down or wind up in court. That’s because Moriarty’s flowers are several inches higher than the 10 inches allowed in the city code against common nuisance.

With all the challenges Kansas City faces — gun violence, homelessness, crumbling abandoned buildings, the lack of affordable housing, trashy vacant lots and so much more — we have one question: Huh?”

Despite actual crime running rife throughout the city, the code enforcers are out in full force to make sure 80-year-old vets don’t have tall flowers. So, after wasting tax payer money to stake out Moriarty’s yard and photograph what he thought were “weeds,” code inspector Leon Bowman told Moriarty that he has 10 days to cut these “weeds” or else.

If Moriarty doesn’t cut his flowers, he will be subject to fines and eventually — if he resists this extortion — a warrant will be issued for his arrest and he will be kidnapped and caged.

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Study shows common insecticide is harmful in any amount

A new UC Riverside study shows that a type of insecticide made for commercial plant nurseries is harmful to a typical bee even when applied well below the label rate.

The study was published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.

Chemically similar to nicotine, neonicotinoids are insecticides that protect against plant-consuming insects like aphids, but seriously harm beneficial insects, like bees. They are widely used by commercial growers.

Much research has focused on their use in food crops like canola, in which they are typically applied at low doses. However, this study is one of the few to examine neonicotinoid application in potted ornamental plants, which can represent more potent, acute sources of exposure to the toxin for bees.

“Neonicotinoids are often used on food crops as a seed treatment,” explained UCR entomologist and lead study author Jacob Cecala. “But they’re usually applied in higher amounts to ornamental plants for aesthetic reasons. The effects are deadly no matter how much the plants are watered.”

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RESEARCH: Dandelion leaf extract blocks spike proteins from binding to the ACE2 cell surface receptor

The engineered spike proteins from SARS-CoV-2 can be STOPPED by a common “weed” that is exterminated from lawns every year. A German university study found that the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinalecan block spike proteins from binding to the ACE2 cell surface receptors in human lung and kidney cells. The water-based dandelion extract, taken from the plant’s dried leaves, was effective against spike protein D614 and a host of mutant strains, including D614G, N501Y, K417N and E484K.

Dandelion extract blocks SARS CoV-2 spike proteins and their variants

The researchers used high molecular weight compounds taken from a water-based dandelion extract and put them to the test in human HEK293-hACE2 kidney and A549-hACE2-TMPRSS2 lung cells. The dandelion blocked the protein-to-protein interactions between the S1 sub unit of the spike protein and the human ACE2 cell surface receptor. This effect was also true against the spike protein mutations from the predominant variants in circulation, including the United Kingdom (B.1.1.7), South African (B.1.351) and Brazilian (P.1) variant.

The dandelion extract stopped SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped lentivirus particles from attaching to lung cells and stopped an inflammatory process called interleukin-6 secretion. Because the study was conducted in vitro, further clinical studies are needed to understand how the dandelion extract is absorbed and utilized in biological systems of the human body.

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Popular weed killer impairs insect immune systems, raising malaria risk

Unexpected new findings from researchers at Johns Hopkins University are indicating the world’s most commonly used herbicide appears to weaken the immune systems of insects. One experiment with mosquitos known to spread malaria suggests the chemical can increase the insect’s susceptibility to parasitic infection, possibly increasing risk of human disease transmission.

Glyphosate is a weed-killer that has been in wide agricultural use since the 1970s. It kills plants by disrupting a crucial metabolic process called the shikimate pathway. The pathway is only present in plants, so for many years glyphosate was thought to be an ideal herbicide – harmless to everything but plants.

Over recent years, however, concerns have been raised over the chemical’s effect on the surrounding environment and humans. Austria and Vietnam were two of the first countries to outright ban the herbicide, while several others are undergoing a staged phase-out of its use over the coming years.

The effects of glyphosate on insects is still a source of much debate. Studies have found the herbicide can disrupt gut bacteria in insects, and this can lead to behavioral or physiological changes. A new study is suggesting glyphosate could impair immunity in insects, and this may lead to damaging consequences for human health.

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City Fines Elderly Man $30,000, Threatens to Steal His Home Because His Grass Was Too Tall — Court Upholds Fines as Constitutional

 Jim Ficken is not a criminal, has never been in jail, and is a model citizen in the town of Dunedin, Florida. However, the government dealt a massive blow to property rights by fining him $30,000 and threat of foreclosure — because his grass grew too tall while he looked after his mother’s estate.

The entire police state overreach began for Ficken in 2018 when he was out of town trying to take care of his late mother’s estate and his grass did what grass does, it grew. Knowing that it is unpleasing to neighbors to grow long grass, Ficken hired a friend to cut it for him while he was away, but that friend died and Ficken had no idea.

“The grass did what grass does… and a code inspector saw it was more than the 10 inches the city allows and Jim was on the hook,” said Andrew Ward, one of Ficken’s attorneys from the Institute for Justice.

IJ plans to appeal the decision but for now, it means that governments can impose maximum fines for petty code violations without first providing notice that the fines are accruing.

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