Video Surfaces Of Final Debate Moderator ‘Tipping Off’ Hillary Clinton Campaign On Interview Questions In 2016

NBC News reporter Kristen Welker, the debate moderator for the final presidential debate, has strong ties to Democrat activism and has even been caught on camera “tipping off” a member of Hillary Clinton’s failed presidential campaign about “at least one question” that she was going to ask during an interview, according to a new report.

“Welker comes from an established Democratic family — who have poured cash into party coffers, and to Trump opponents, for years,” The New York Post reported. “Her mother, Julie Welker, a prominent real estate broker in Philadelphia, and father, Harvey Welker, a consulting engineer, have donated tens of thousands of dollars to Democratic candidates and close to $20,000 to Barack Obama alone. There was also $3,300 for Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign and $2,100 for Hillary Clinton’s doomed 2016 presidential effort against Trump. Another $7,300 was contributed to the Democratic National Committee between 2004 and 2020.”

The report comes after Chris Wallace, a registered Democrat who moderated the first debate, and Savannah Guthrie, who hosted a town hall last week with President Donald Trump, have both been widely criticized for bias during the two events.

The New York Post’s Jon Levine also highlighted photographs that were on Welker’s Facebook page that showed that she and her family celebrated Christmas at the White House with the Obamas in 2012.

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Kristen Welker, upcoming presidential debate moderator, has deep Democrat ties

All eyes are turning to NBC News White House correspondent Kristen Welker as she prepares to host the third and final presidential debate Thursday.

President Trump and Joe Biden will square off at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn., in a 90-minute debate starting at 9 p.m.

Welker, 44, has been the White House correspondent at NBC News since 2011, after working as a news reporter in Rhode Island.

But Trump supporters who took issue with hard questioning by previous moderators like Chris Wallace and Savannah Guthrie may find themselves pining for those combative hosts after Welker is done with the president.

Welker comes from an established Democratic family — who have poured cash into party coffers, and to Trump opponents, for years.

Her mother, Julie Welker, a prominent real estate broker in Philadelphia, and father, Harvey Welker, a consulting engineer, have donated tens of thousands of dollars to Democratic candidates and close to $20,000 to Barack Obama alone.

There was also $3,300 for Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign and $2,100 for Hillary Clinton’s doomed 2016 presidential effort against Trump. Another $7,300 was contributed to the Democratic National Committee between 2004 and 2020.

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Moderator For 2nd Trump-Biden Debate Worked As Intern For Biden, Staff Assistant For Ted Kennedy

The second presidential debate, scheduled for October 15, will be moderated by Steve Scully, the political editor at C-SPAN and host of Washington Journal, who once worked as an intern for Senator Joe Biden in college, later working as a staff assistant in Sen. Edward M. Kennedy’s communication office.

“While attending college, he served as an intern in the office of Delaware Sen. Joseph R. Biden, and later a staff assistant in Sen. Edward M. Kennedy’s media affairs office,” Utah Valley University noted.

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University Sets Up “Support Spaces” For Students Traumatized By Presidential Debate

Ohio’s Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), the site of last night’s Presidential debate has set up dedicated ‘support spaces’ for students who have been triggered by the tense exchange.

For any poor snowflake babies who couldn’t handle the nasty orange man telling Joe Biden “There’s nothing smart about you,” CWRU is providing a “confidential safe space” where they can talk and cry about it.

The University says “students can discuss the impact of recent national events, including the presidential debate and upcoming election.”

There are eight “presidential debate support spaces” available for students to attend, according to the university which asks that everybody use “respectful dialogue.”

The spaces will remain active from Monday through to next Friday, for ‘virtual counselling sessions’.

The university announced that the “Support Space is not a substitute for psychotherapy and does not constitute mental health treatment.”

The spaces are a throwback to 2016 when education centers offered counseling after Trump won the election.

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