I found an Amazon folder with thousands of audio recordings from my home gadgets

A woman was shocked to discover just how much data Amazon has collected about her.

She posted a viral TikTok video explaining how she requested to see the data but wasn’t expecting to receive so much.

TikToker my.data.not.yours explained: “I requested all the data Amazon has on me and here’s what I found.”

She revealed that she has three Amazon smart speakers.

Two are Amazon Dot speakers and one is an Echo device.

Her home also contains smart bulbs.

She said: “When I downloaded the ZIP file these are all the folders it came with.”

The TikToker then clicked on the audio file and revealed thousands of short voice clips that she claims Amazon has collected from her smart speakers.

She described them as “so scary” and played one of her talking about turning on a light.

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See the light: Philips Hue smart bulbs can be hacked and used to install malware

We’ve all heard the horror stories of hackers remotely steering smart cars off the road, but even the smallest of smart devices can lead to big problems if they’re not monitored carefully.

This was on full display when a flaw was discovered that exposed the home networks of people using the very popular Philips Hue smart bulbs. Researchers from cyber security firm Check Point revealed how a bug enabled them to infiltrate the bulbs with a drone that hovers outside a building. They were able to gain access to the bulbs as well as the control bridge that leads to the users’ network, which means it is possible to compromise a person’s home network or even that of a business or smart city using the bulbs.

To infiltrate the users’ network, the researchers exploited a previously discovered bug that Philips hadn’t fixed that allowed them to control aspects of the bulb like brightness and color. After lowering and raising the brightness or changing the color to trick the user into believing the bulb had a glitch, the user would then reset the product by deleting it from their app and then attempting to rediscover it. However, once they rediscovered the compromised bulb, it was able to offload malware onto the control bridge. The users’ home network is linked to this central hub, which means the malware or spyware could infect the entire network.

Check Point Research Head of Cyber Research Yaniv Balmas said: “Many of us are aware that IoT devices can pose a security risk, but this research shows how even the most mundane, seemingly ‘dumb’ devices such as light bulbs can be exploited by hackers and used to take over networks or plant malware.”

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How “Smart” Bulbs Track Your Behavior (Even When Lights Are Turned Off) and Why Manufacturers Want Your Data

Privacy and security experts have warned for many years about privacy and cybersecurity risks associated with ALL “Smart” and wireless technology – cell phones (see 123), medical devices and implants (see 12), personal and “Smart” home devices and wearables (see 123456), utility “Smart” meters (electric, gas, and water), and everything that uses Internet of Things (IoT) technology (see 1, 2). Last month, researchers from Carnegie Melon University proposed product warning labels that would make it easier for consumers to understand this.

Of course, manufacturers may not be in a hurry to use them because their “Smart” products allow them to collect data on consumers to analyze and sell to 3rd parties.  This is referred to as “Surveillance Capitalism.” “Smart” light bulbs can be used for this as well.

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