WHO calls for Big Tech to work with it to censor monkeypox “misinformation”

The World Health Organization (WHO), an unelected health agency that was given sweeping censorship powers during the COVID-19 pandemic, has called for all social media platforms to work with it to “prevent and counter” monkeypox “misinformation” and “disinformation.”

During a COVID-19 press briefing, WHO Director-General, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, claimed that “stigma and discrimination can be as dangerous as any virus, and can fuel the outbreak.”

He continued by invoking so-called COVID-19 misinformation and disinformation and urged “all social media platforms, tech companies, and news organizations to work with us to prevent and counter harmful information.”

While Dr. Tedros didn’t specify which statements he wanted Big Tech to suppress under his proposed monkeypox misinformation censorship plan, numerous media outlets have complained that those who call monkeypox a “gay disease” or frame monkeypox as “exclusively affecting men who have sex with men” are spreading misinformation.

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Scientists Want To Rename Monkeypox Because It’s ‘Stigmatizing’ To Africans

A group of scientists, mostly hailing from Africa, are calling for the scientific community to rename monkeypox viruses due to concerns that the current geographically-determined names are offensive.

The group of 29 scientists wrote Friday that scientists should rename two monkeypox virus clades — the “West African” clade and the “Congo Basin” clade — to be identified by numbers instead of geographic origin points. The scientists said that, with growing attention on monkeypox caused by outbreaks in the West, the viruses should be renamed in line with best practices within the healthcare industry.

“Given the increasingly rapid communication of, and attention to, the international human MPXV outbreak, it is important to consider an appropriate, non-discriminatory, and non-stigmatizing nomenclature and classification of MPXV clades,” their publication said.

The scientists propose renaming the monkeypox clades to clades 1, 2 and 3, corresponding with the order of detection. Clade 1 would be the formerly-called “Congo Basin” clade, sometimes referred to as the “Central African” clade, and clades 2 and 3 would be the formerly “West African” clade.

“Failure to support and adopt the proposed nomenclature and classification may result in loss of interest in sustaining active surveillance and rapid reporting of pathogens with epidemic and pandemic potentials, by scientists and national public health institutions in Africa,” the scientists go on to say.

One of the scientists involved in the position paper, director of the African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases Dr. Christian Happi, told STAT News that the way the media is covering the monkeypox outbreak in the West is “racist.”

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Two Studies now suggest the circulating Monkeypox Virus has been manipulated in a Biolab

Monkeypox illness usually begins with a fever before a rash develops one to five days later, often beginning on the face then spreading to other parts of the body. The rash changes and goes through different stages before finally forming a scab which later falls off. An individual is contagious until all the scabs have fallen off and there is intact skin underneath.

The disease has always been extremely rare and was first identified in humans in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in a 9-year-old boy. Since then, human cases of monkeypox have been reported in 11 African countries. It wasn’t until 2003 that the first monkeypox outbreak outside of Africa was recorded, and this was in the United States, and it has never been recorded in multiple countries at the same time.

Until now.

A new study published by Portugal’s National Institute of Health has uncovered evidence that the virus responsible for the Monkeypox outbreak allegedly sweeping across Europe, America and Australia, has been heavily manipulated in a lab by scientists, and further evidence suggests it has been released intentionally.

The study was published May 23rd 2022 and can be accessed in full here.

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Monkeypox Outbreak Caused by Climate Change, Professor Claims

Climate change is to blame for the recent outbreak of monkeypox, an Irish professor of epidemiology claims.

After the Republic of Ireland saw its first two monkeypox cases last week, Dublin City University Professor Anthony Staines surmised the zoonotic disease represents a climate change catastrophe.

“Climate change is driving animal populations out of their normal ranges and human populations into areas where animals live,” Prof. Staines said on the NewsTalk program On The Record with Gavan Reilly

“There’s a very detailed analysis of about 40 years of data published in [the journal] Nature a few months ago that documents what has happened and predicts what may happen in the future and it’s very much driven now by climate change – and to an extent by human population growth. 

“But climate change is pushing people into cities, it’s pushing animals into closer proximity with people and we’re seeing connections that we never saw before. 

“So this is what living with climate change looks like.” 

The professor’s assertions come as billionaire globalist Bill Gates warned there’s a 50 percent chance the next pandemic could be caused by climate change, or be the result of a man-made virus released by a bioterrorist.

Commenting on whether monkeypox could pose a threat to humanity on par with Covid-19, Gates said “there’s very little chance” it will have a similar impact, but cautioned there’s a potential for it to mutate into a more virulent disease.

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The NHS just edited their Monkeypox page…to make it scarier

Afew days ago the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) edited their Monkeypox page to alter the narrative in a few key ways.

Firstly, they removed a paragraph from the “How do you get Monkeypox?” section.

Up until a few days ago, according to archived links, the Monkeypox page said this, regarding person-to-person tranmission [emphasis added]:

It’s very uncommon to get monkeypox from a person with the infection because it does not spread easily between people.

…this has now been totally removed.

Secondly, they’ve removed this paragraph, which was present up until at least November of 2021 (and maybe much more recently, there are no archives between November and May) [emphasis added]:

[Monkeypox] is usually a mild illness that will get better on its own without treatment. Some people can develop more serious symptoms, so patients with monkeypox in the UK are cared for in specialist hospitals.

The new “treatment” paragraph reads [again, emphasis added]…

Treatment for monkeypox aims to relieve symptoms. The illness is usually mild and most people recover in 2 to 4 weeks […] You may need to stay in a specialist hospital, so your symptoms can be treated and to prevent the infection spreading to other people.

So, they remove that it will “get better on its own”, and again reinforce the idea of spreading the disease despite this being described as “very uncommon” as recently as last week.

They even add a line about self-isolating, which was never mentioned before:

as monkeypox can spread if there is close contact, you will need to be isolated if you’re diagnosed with it.

Finally, they now include a warning you can get Monkeypox by eating undercooked meat, which will doubtless feed into the anti-meat narrative too (oh, wait, it already is).

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The Infamous Wuhan Lab Recently Assembled Monkeypox Strains Using Methods Flagged For Creating ‘Contagious Pathogens’.

The Wuhan Institute of Virology assembled a monkeypox virus genome, allowing the virus to be identified through PCR tests, using a method researchers flagged for potentially creating a “contagious pathogen,” The National Pulse can reveal.

The study was first published in February 2022, just months before the latest international outbreak of monkeypox cases which appear to have now reached the United States.

The paper, which was authored by nine Wuhan Institute of Virology researchers and published in the lab’s quarterly scientific journal Virologica Sinica, also follows the wide-scale use of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests to identify COVID-19-positive individuals.

Researchers appeared to identify a portion of the monkeypox virus genome, enabling PCR tests to identify the virus, in the paper: “Efficient Assembly of a Large Fragment of Monkeypox Virus Genome as a qPCR Template Using Dual-Selection Based Transformation-Associated Recombination.”

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