Nearly 50% of participants in ‘Monkeypox in women’ study were biological men

A study on monkeypox in women was published in The Lancet recently in which almost half of the cohort being studied were males who identify as women.

In the study published in the world-class medical journal on November 17, researchers analyzed data for a total of 136 individuals with the monkeypox virus infection across 15 countries. There were 62 “trans women,” 69 “cis” women, and 5 non-binary individuals who were grouped with the “cis” women to form a category of “people assigned female at birth.”

The study notes that since May 2022, global outbreaks of human monkeypox infection have been reported in over 78,000 people, predominantly in men who have sex with men. The proportion of women has been very low, and very few studies have distinguished between cis and trans women.

Around 90% of the cases reported sex with men, and 27% were living with HIV, with 50% of the males who identify as women also being HIV+ compared to just 8% of the actual women. 

The study concluded that the “clinical features of monkeypox in women and non-binary individuals were similar to those described in men,” and that anatomically, “anogenital lesions were reflective of sexual practices: vulvovaginal lesions predominated in cis women and non-binary individuals and anorectal features predominated in trans women.” 

Maya Forstater took to Twitter to point out that it was hardly surprising that the findings showed women having similar clinical features as males when almost half the “women” studied were male.

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WHO Renames Monkeypox… Because Racism

Three months ago, the World Health Organization – in all its ‘expertise’ – decided to prioritize resources in seeking the public’s help in renaming Monkeypox, as “part of an ongoing effort to discourage harmful misconceptions associated with the current name.” The renaming effort followed “demands from international scientists” and “public health officials” who have claimed that the current name encourages a harmful stigma.

Both the monkeypox and mpox names will be used by WHO over the next year as the term “monkeypox” is gradually phased out, WHO said in a press release.

“When the outbreak of monkeypox expanded earlier this year, racist and stigmatizing language online, in other settings and in some communities was observed and reported to WHO,” the press release stated.

As the WHO explains:

Human monkeypox was given its name in 1970 (after the virus that causes the disease was discovered in captive monkeys in 1958), before the publication of WHO best practices in naming diseases, published in 2015. According to these best practices, new disease names should be given with the aim to minimize unnecessary negative impact of names on trade, travel, tourism or animal welfare, and avoid causing offence to any cultural, social, national, regional, professional or ethnic groups.

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The United States is moving to tighten oversight of studies that could make viruses more dangerous. But how far should it go?

In a U.S. government lab in Bethesda, Maryland, virologists plan to equip the strain of the monkeypox virus that spread globally this year, causing mostly rash and flulike symptoms, with genes from a second monkeypox strain that causes more serious illness. Then they’ll see whether any of the changes make the virus more lethal to mice. The researchers hope that unraveling how specific genes make monkeypox more deadly will lead to better drugs and vaccines.

Some scientists are alarmed by the planned experiments, which were first reported by Science. If a more potent version of the outbreak strain accidentally escaped the high-containment, high-security lab at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), it could spark an “epidemic with substantially more lethality,” fears epidemiologist Thomas Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. That’s why he and others argue the experiments should undergo a special review required for especially risky U.S.-funded studies that might create a pathogen that could launch a catastrophic pandemic.

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WHO calls for Big Tech to work with it to censor monkeypox “misinformation”

The World Health Organization (WHO), an unelected health agency that was given sweeping censorship powers during the COVID-19 pandemic, has called for all social media platforms to work with it to “prevent and counter” monkeypox “misinformation” and “disinformation.”

During a COVID-19 press briefing, WHO Director-General, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, claimed that “stigma and discrimination can be as dangerous as any virus, and can fuel the outbreak.”

He continued by invoking so-called COVID-19 misinformation and disinformation and urged “all social media platforms, tech companies, and news organizations to work with us to prevent and counter harmful information.”

While Dr. Tedros didn’t specify which statements he wanted Big Tech to suppress under his proposed monkeypox misinformation censorship plan, numerous media outlets have complained that those who call monkeypox a “gay disease” or frame monkeypox as “exclusively affecting men who have sex with men” are spreading misinformation.

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Scientists Want To Rename Monkeypox Because It’s ‘Stigmatizing’ To Africans

A group of scientists, mostly hailing from Africa, are calling for the scientific community to rename monkeypox viruses due to concerns that the current geographically-determined names are offensive.

The group of 29 scientists wrote Friday that scientists should rename two monkeypox virus clades — the “West African” clade and the “Congo Basin” clade — to be identified by numbers instead of geographic origin points. The scientists said that, with growing attention on monkeypox caused by outbreaks in the West, the viruses should be renamed in line with best practices within the healthcare industry.

“Given the increasingly rapid communication of, and attention to, the international human MPXV outbreak, it is important to consider an appropriate, non-discriminatory, and non-stigmatizing nomenclature and classification of MPXV clades,” their publication said.

The scientists propose renaming the monkeypox clades to clades 1, 2 and 3, corresponding with the order of detection. Clade 1 would be the formerly-called “Congo Basin” clade, sometimes referred to as the “Central African” clade, and clades 2 and 3 would be the formerly “West African” clade.

“Failure to support and adopt the proposed nomenclature and classification may result in loss of interest in sustaining active surveillance and rapid reporting of pathogens with epidemic and pandemic potentials, by scientists and national public health institutions in Africa,” the scientists go on to say.

One of the scientists involved in the position paper, director of the African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases Dr. Christian Happi, told STAT News that the way the media is covering the monkeypox outbreak in the West is “racist.”

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Two Studies now suggest the circulating Monkeypox Virus has been manipulated in a Biolab

Monkeypox illness usually begins with a fever before a rash develops one to five days later, often beginning on the face then spreading to other parts of the body. The rash changes and goes through different stages before finally forming a scab which later falls off. An individual is contagious until all the scabs have fallen off and there is intact skin underneath.

The disease has always been extremely rare and was first identified in humans in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in a 9-year-old boy. Since then, human cases of monkeypox have been reported in 11 African countries. It wasn’t until 2003 that the first monkeypox outbreak outside of Africa was recorded, and this was in the United States, and it has never been recorded in multiple countries at the same time.

Until now.

A new study published by Portugal’s National Institute of Health has uncovered evidence that the virus responsible for the Monkeypox outbreak allegedly sweeping across Europe, America and Australia, has been heavily manipulated in a lab by scientists, and further evidence suggests it has been released intentionally.

The study was published May 23rd 2022 and can be accessed in full here.

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Monkeypox Outbreak Caused by Climate Change, Professor Claims

Climate change is to blame for the recent outbreak of monkeypox, an Irish professor of epidemiology claims.

After the Republic of Ireland saw its first two monkeypox cases last week, Dublin City University Professor Anthony Staines surmised the zoonotic disease represents a climate change catastrophe.

“Climate change is driving animal populations out of their normal ranges and human populations into areas where animals live,” Prof. Staines said on the NewsTalk program On The Record with Gavan Reilly

“There’s a very detailed analysis of about 40 years of data published in [the journal] Nature a few months ago that documents what has happened and predicts what may happen in the future and it’s very much driven now by climate change – and to an extent by human population growth. 

“But climate change is pushing people into cities, it’s pushing animals into closer proximity with people and we’re seeing connections that we never saw before. 

“So this is what living with climate change looks like.” 

The professor’s assertions come as billionaire globalist Bill Gates warned there’s a 50 percent chance the next pandemic could be caused by climate change, or be the result of a man-made virus released by a bioterrorist.

Commenting on whether monkeypox could pose a threat to humanity on par with Covid-19, Gates said “there’s very little chance” it will have a similar impact, but cautioned there’s a potential for it to mutate into a more virulent disease.

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