Designer of AOC’s ‘Tax The Rich’ Met Gala Dress Owes Over $100K in Back Taxes, Accused of Being a Rent Deadbeat and Running ‘Sweatshop’ of Unpaid Interns

Proving irony never goes out of style, Aurora James, the designer of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ (D-NY) viral “Tax the Rich” Met Gala gown, is a tax deadbeat herself, according to a report by the New York Post.

James is “a notorious tax deadbeat with unpaid debts dogging her in multiple states,” reported the Post, digging up records that show six IRS tax liens totaling $103,220 on the parent company of her fashion brand, three open tax warrants in New York State for failing to withhold $14,798 in income taxes from employee paychecks (plus twelve other since-resolved NY tax warrants), and a $17,000 fine for failing to carry worker’s compensation insurance.

She’s also a rent deadbeat, the Post claims, describing an eviction action by James’ previous landlord — along with a demand for more than $25,000 plus interest for staying beyond her lease. The case was settled for an undisclosed amount.

Another previous landlord reportedly sued James for more $5,000 in unpaid rent, sending her a letter complaining that she had “never have paid your rent in a timely manner.”

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Attended Met Gala with Billionaire Seagram’s Heir Benjamin Bronfman

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attended the 2021 Met Gala on Monday night with billionaire Seagram’s heir Benjamin Bronfman, who is dating her dress designer, Aurora James.

Ocasio-Cortez claimed her presence at the Met Gala clad in an ultra-fancy “Tax the Rich” dress was a political protest against the wealthy, and that she “punctured the 4th wall of excess and spectacle,” but critics say the move was a chief example of hypocrisy.

Moreover, Ocasio-Cortez — along with her boyfriend Riley Roberts — was spotted walking the red carpet with Aurora James and Benjamin Bronfman, who has an estimated net worth of $100 million, and whose father, Edgar Bronfman Jr., has an estimated net worth of $2.5 billion, as the family founded the Seagram’s drinks company.

While some argued that Ocasio-Cortez’s “Tax the Rich” dress was an insult to the wealthy people who donate to the gala, others pointed out that those whom government defines as “rich” are often middle and working class Americans.

President Joe Biden recently broke his pledge not to increase taxes on working-class Americans, as the Democrats’ $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill would raise taxes on Americans making over $50,000 or more per year in the calendar year 2031.

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AOC Says It’s Her “Responsibility” to Party With Rich People, Elites as She Calls Herself “Working Class”

Socialist Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may be the dumbest representative in Congress.

After getting completely demolished for her “Tax the Rich” dress at the Met Gala, Ocasio-Cortez took to Twitter to explain how she is not a hypocrite.

Tickets to attend the Met Gala costed on average $30,000 and tables at the event were $275,000. The only people who could attend the event were the ultra-wealthy or elites with high up connections.

The socialist representative said she wasn’t being a hypocrite because it was her “responsibility to party with the elites” as she scolded all the peasant “haters.”

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The Masking of the Servant Class: Ugly COVID Images From the Met Gala Are Now Commonplace

From the start of the pandemic, political elites have been repeatedly caught exempting themselves from the restrictive rules they impose on the lives of those over whom they rule. Governorsmayorsministers and Speakers of the House have been filmed violating their own COVID protocols in order to dine with their closest lobbyist-friends, enjoy a coddled hair styling in chic salons, or unwind after signing new lockdown and quarantine orders by sneaking away for a weekend getaway with the family. The trend became so widespread that ABC News gathered all the examples under the headline “Elected officials slammed for hypocrisy for not following own COVID-19 advice,” while Business Insider in May updated the reporting with this: “14 prominent Democrats stand accused of hypocrisy for ignoring COVID-19 restrictions they’re urging their constituents to obey.”

Most of those transgressions were too flagrant to ignore and thus produced some degree of scandal and resentment for the political officials granting themselves such license. Dominant liberal culture is, if nothing else, fiercely rule-abiding: they get very upset when they see anyone defying decrees from authorities, even if the rule-breaker is the official who promulgated the directives for everyone else. Photos released last November of California Governor Gavin Newsom giggling maskless as he sat with other maskless state health officials celebrating the birthday of a powerful lobbyist — just one month after he told the public to “to keep your mask on in between bites” and while severe state-imposed restrictions were in place regarding leaving one’s home — caused a drop in popularity and helped fueled a recall initiative against him. Newsom and these other officials broke their own rules, and even among liberals who venerate their leaders as celebrities, rule-breaking is frowned upon.

But as is so often the case, the most disturbing aspects of elite behavior are found not in what they have prohibited but rather in what they have decided is permissible. When it comes to mask mandates, it is now commonplace to see two distinct classes of people: those who remain maskless as they are served, and those they employ as their servants who must have their faces covered at all times. Prior to the COVID pandemic, it was difficult to imagine how the enormous chasm between the lives of cultural and political elites and everyone else could be made any larger, yet the pandemic generated a new form of crude cultural segregation: a series of protocols which ensure that maskless elites need not ever cast eyes upon the faces of their servant class.

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