Police Consider Placing Flowers On Car Windshields “Suspicious Activity”

America’s law enforcement never ceases to amaze and frustrate me.

A recent story about placing flowers on a windshield might have you wanting to scream into a pillow in disgust.

Channel 10 WBNS wrote, that an Ohio woman who received over $300 in roses from her fiancé for Valentine’s Day was worried that all her flowers would go to waste.

“I think (my fiancé) ended up saying that he spent over $300 in just roses,” Brittaney Strupe said. “He was just going to throw them outside or in the trash, so I told him, instead of wasting, we should pass it on.”

So her sister, daughter and Brittaney decided “to spread some love, by placing roses on vehicles.”

Her daughter Kiara suggested putting roses on people’s windshields in a Walmart parking lot.

“We should just go to Walmart, thinking like, oh yeah, this will be a good idea, people are going to come out and think it’s awesome, and that didn’t happen,” Kiara Strupe said.

So what happened you ask?

The “If You See Something Say Something,” American snitch culture happened of course.

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DC Elitists Call Cops On Truck With ‘Don’t Tread On Me’ Plates, Fearing It May Be An ‘Insurrection Vehicle’

RESIDENTS OF AN ELITE WASHINGTON, D.C. NEIGHBORHOOD TOOK TO AN INTERNET MESSAGE BOARD IN A STATE OF PANIC AFTER SPOTTING A WHITE MAN PARKING HIS WORK TRUCK ON THE SIDE OF A PUBLIC STREET, EVENTUALLY CALLING POLICE OVER FEARS THAT THE TRUCK WAS AN “INSURRECTIONIST” VEHICLE.

According to a recent report from The Washington Post, residents of the elite Adams Morgan neighborhood in Washington, D.C. took to the Next Door app – a hyper localized social media network described as a cross between Facebook and Craigslist – to accuse the vehicle’s driver of engaging in domestic terrorism, honing in on the color of the driver’s skin and the truck’s Gadsden Flag, “Don’t Tread on Me” license plates as evidence of impending doom.

“There’s this suspicious white truck that is parked on the corner of Belmont and 19th,” the thread’s original post claimed, describing the driver as a white male and making note of the truck’s “Don’t Tread on Me” tags, which are available to anyone with a vehicle registered in Virginia.

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New “See Something, Say Something Online Act” Turns Social Media Users Into Spies

Senator Joe Manchin wants to bring DHS’s spy on your neighbors, “If You See, Something Say Something”  program to social media, blogs, websites, and much more. Manchin’s bill, the “See Something, Say Something Online Act” would essentially turn social media users into Federal spies by forcing them to report suspicious people to law enforcement.

Just how bad is this bill?

This bill would essentially force anyone on social media to report suspicious “transmissions” to law enforcement.

“Known Suspicious Transmission.—The term ‘‘known suspicious transmission’’ is any suspicious transmission that an interactive computer service should have reasonably known to have occurred or have been notified of by a director, officer, employ, agent, interactive computer service user, or State or Federal law enforcement agency.”

Major Crime —The term ‘‘major crime’’ means a Federal criminal offense that is a crime of violence (as defined 13 in section 16 of title 18, United States Code); relating to domestic or international terrorism (as those terms are defined in section 16 2331 of title 18, United States Code)

What exactly is a known suspicious transmission or major crime?

The term “suspicious transmission” means any public or private post, message, comment, tag, transaction, or any other user-generated content or transmission that commits, facilitates, incites, promotes, or otherwise assists the commission of a major crime.

How could social media users, bloggers, web forum moderators, web conferencing users, etc. know that a comment left or uttered by someone would later lead to them committing a major crime?

The See Something, Say Something Online Act would force social media users into red-flagging every person’s comments just in case someone commits a major crime in the future.

This bill would effectively destroy the First Amendment as we know it, dispelling any vestiges of America still being a free country.

Social media users would be forced to submit a Suspicious Transmission Activity Report (STAR) on suspicious individuals within 30 days.

“In General.—If a provider of an interactive computer service detects a suspicious transmission, the interactive computer service, including any director, officer, employee, agent, or representative of such provider, shall submit to the Department a STAR describing the suspicious transmission in accordance with this section.”

As Reason warned, the See Something, Say Something Online Act would put reporting on your fellow American on steroids. It would create a glut of frivolous reports, including many that are politically motivated, or otherwise disingenuous.

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Meet the Undercover Anti-Fascists

On the morning of Wednesday, January 6th, as supporters of Donald Trump gathered near the White House for a last stand to “Save America,” Molly Conger said goodbye to her two dachshunds, Otto and Buck, tossed a wig into her car, and began the two-hour drive from her home in Charlottesville, Virginia, to Washington, D.C.

A journalist and online researcher, Conger specializes in infiltrating and exposing the violent far right. Using dummy accounts and pseudonyms, she lurks in private chat rooms and invitation-only forums used by neo-Nazis, militias, Proud Boys, and other right-wing extremists. When she sees someone make threats or plan for violence, she screenshots the person’s messages, digs up the person’s real identity and employer, and publishes her findings on her Twitter account, @SocialistDogMom, where she has more than 110,000 followers.

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CNN Mask Karen Freaks Out, Calls Police On Super Bowl Revellers

“I gave a call to Tampa Police to ask them what’s going on with all these people that are out and about and not wearing masks because there is a mask mandate in the City of Tampa while this pandemic is underway and during this time of the game there,” she whinged.

“You’re supposed to be wearing a mask if you’re anywhere near Raymond James Stadium, if you’re in a bar or a restaurant or anywhere in one of these event or entertainment areas. And you can see from the pictures and the video that we have that people are just not paying much attention to that mask mandate,” Kaye urged.

She continued, “They are supposed to be fined up to $500.00. So I asked the Tampa Police, how many citations have been issued? What do you want to say in response to this? What’s being done about it?”

The police didn’t bother responding to her frothing.

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The Journalistic Tattletale and Censorship Industry Suffers Several Well-Deserved Blows

A new and rapidly growing journalistic “beat” has arisen over the last several years that can best be described as an unholy mix of junior high hall-monitor tattling and Stasi-like citizen surveillance. It is half adolescent and half malevolent. Its primary objectives are control, censorship, and the destruction of reputations for fun and power. Though its epicenter is the largest corporate media outlets, it is the very antithesis of journalism.

I’ve written before about one particularly toxic strain of this authoritarian “reporting.” Teams of journalists at three of the most influential corporate media outlets — CNN’s “media reporters” (Brian Stelter and Oliver Darcy), NBC’s “disinformation space unit” (Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny), and the tech reporters of The New York Times (Mike Isaac, Kevin Roose, Sheera Frenkel) — devote the bulk of their “journalism” to searching for online spaces where they believe speech and conduct rules are being violated, flagging them, and then pleading that punitive action be taken (banning, censorship, content regulation, after-school detention). These hall-monitor reporters are a major factor explaining why tech monopolies, which (for reasons of self-interest and ideology) never wanted the responsibility to censor, now do so with abandon and seemingly arbitrary blunt force: they are shamed by the world’s loudest media companies when they do not.

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MELTDOWN: AOC Begs Supporters To Mass Report #AlexandriaOcasioSmollet Hashtag In New Email

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) begged supporters to mass report the viral #AlexandriaOcasioSmollett hashtag on Facebook and Twitter this week, signalling that she is not handling the fallout from her debunked tales of fearing for her life and hiding from pro-Trump protesters who were “trying to kill” her on Jan. 6 all that well.

In an email sent from Team AOC, supporters of Ocasio-Cortez are asked for their help in forcing “Facebook and Twitter to take action and enforce their own rules.”

“We need your help,” the email reads. “Here’s what you can do… scan your social media to find posts with this misleading information, especially those using the trending hashtag. Don’t tweet any hashtags yourself, because we don’t want to spread them further!”

Supporters are then commanded to “Identify any posts that are threatening or harassing and use the built-in report features to flag them for moderators. Facebook and Twitter both have built-in tools for reporting posts and tweets that break the rules.”

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Bill Would Force Social Media Users To Secretly Report Suspicious People To Law Enforcement

Senator Joe Manchin wants to bring DHS’s spy on your neighbors “If You See, Something Say Something”  program to social media, blogs, websites, and much more. Manchin’s bill, the “See Something, Say Something Online Act” would essentially turn social media users into federal spies by forcing them to report suspicious people to law enforcement.

Just how bad is this bill?

This bill would essentially force anyone on social media to report suspicious “transmissions” to law enforcement.

Known Suspicious Transmission.—The term ‘‘known suspicious transmission’’ is any suspicious transmission that an interactive computer  service should have reasonably known to have occurred or have been notified of by a director, officer, employ, agent, interactive computer service user, or State or Federal law enforcement agency.

Major Crime —The term ‘‘major crime’’ means a Federal criminal offense that is a crime of violence (as defined 13 in section 16 of title 18, United States Code); relating to domestic or international terrorism (as those terms are defined in section 16 2331 of title 18, United States Code)

What exactly is a known suspicious transmission or major crime?

Suspicious Transmission is defined as any post, private message, comment, tag, transaction, or any other user-generated content or transmission that government officials later determine commits, facilitates, incites, promotes, or otherwise assists the commission of a major crime. Major crimes are defined as anything involving violence, domestic, or international terrorism, or a serious drug offense.

How could social media users, bloggers, web forum moderators, web conferencing users etc., know that a comment left or uttered by someone would later lead to them committing a major crime?

The See Something, Say Something Online Act would force social media users into red flagging every person’s comments just in case someone commits a major crime in the future.

This bill would effectively destroy the First Amendment as we know it, dispelling any vestiges of America still being a free country.

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Turn snitch and get rich: Texas teen gives his own dad in to the FBI, pays his way through college

A Texas teenager has turned his father in to the FBI for taking part in the Capitol Hill riot, and pocketed tens of thousands of dollars from liberal admirers in the process.

When Jackson Reffitt’s father returned to the family home in Wylie, Texas, after the pro-Trump riot on Capitol Hill earlier this month, Jackson claimed that he warned his son to keep his mouth shut. “If you turn me in, you’re a traitor,” he reportedly said. “And you know what happens to traitors. Traitors get shot.”

However, Jackson had already reported the 48-year-old Guy Reffitt to the FBI, telling agents he thought his father was planning “something big” during the certification of election results at the capitol, per a New York Times article on Sunday. After the riot, Reffitt was identified in video footage from the Capitol, tracked down in Texas, and arrested, according to a sworn affidavit by an FBI agent.

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Twitter Encourages Users to Snitch on Each Other with ‘Birdwatch’ Feature

Social media giant Twitter has announced a new feature called “Birdwatch” which aims to encourage users to police and flag each other’s tweets if they believe they spread misinformation. The company claims it wants to “broaden the range of voices” fighting against misinformation, but the feature has the potential to devolve into flagging wars between different factions of users.

In a recent blog post, Twitter announced a new feature on its site called “Birdwatch,” which allows users to add notes with “helpful context” to tweets that they believe are misleading. To participate, users must have certain information on file with Twitter such as their phone number, ostensibly to prove the account belongs to a real person.

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