Deputy Arrested for Torturing Service Dog, Wrapping Him in Duct Tape Before Shooting Him

In the study of psychology, there is a term for those who hurt animals for personal pleasure. It is called intentional animal torture and cruelty and even has its own initialism, IATC. Psychologists have long studied the reasons behind why a person would intentionally harm an animal and the types of people associated with this behavior are often society’s worst. So, when a deputy admits to torturing and then killing a dog, it is likely not the best idea for that person to remain in a position of authority.

Luckily for the taxpayers of Genesee County, they are no longer on the hook for the salary of Genesee County Sheriff’s Office deputy Jacob S. Wilkinson. He was fired this month after admitting to the horrific torture and killing of a service dog.

Normally, when folks find a dead animal, even a dog, on the side of the road, they assume it was likely hit by a vehicle. But when Saginaw County Road Commission employees found this boxer pit bull mix, named ‘Habs’, on the side of the road, they knew instantly that he was not hit by a car.

Habs had been on the roadside for months but was covered in snow. When the snow melted, Habs was found with his mouth duct taped closed and his body wrapped in duct tape to prevent him from moving.

The very idea of duct taping a dog in this fashion is horrifying enough but Wilkinson didn’t stop there. After throwing the completely restrained dog on the side of the road in the snow, Wilkinson put three bullets in Habs’ head and drove off.

Because Habs had been tortured an investigation was launched into his death and when a necropsy — the animal equivalent of an autopsy — was conducted, they found he’d been chipped. Investigators had no idea their investigation would lead back to one of their own — deputy Wilkinson.

Wilkinson worked as a corrections officer for the Michigan Department of Corrections before becoming a deputy with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office. Habs was part of a program with veteran inmates who train dogs to become service animals for veterans — called Blue Star Service Dogs.

“These dogs master basic obedience, command training, and pre-task training and basic tasks such as turning off and on lights, picking up objects, and opening doors,” Blue Star’s website states.

Saginaw County Animal Care & Control Director Bonnie Kanicki told mLive that Habs was in the training program when Wilkinson adopted him.

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Jackboots Policing: No-Knock Raids Rip A Hole In The Fourth Amendment

It’s the middle of the night.

Your neighborhood is in darkness. Your household is asleep.

Suddenly, you’re awakened by a loud noise.

Someone or an army of someones has crashed through your front door.

The intruders are in your home.

Your heart begins racing. Your stomach is tied in knots. The adrenaline is pumping through you.

You’re not just afraid. You’re terrified.

Desperate to protect yourself and your loved ones from whatever threat has invaded your home, you scramble to lay hold of something—anything—that you might use in self-defense. It might be a flashlight, a baseball bat, or that licensed and registered gun you thought you’d never need.

You brace for the confrontation.

Shadowy figures appear at the doorway, screaming orders, threatening violence.

Chaos reigns.

You stand frozen, your hands gripping whatever means of self-defense you could find.

Just that simple act—of standing frozen in fear and self-defense—is enough to spell your doom.

The assailants open fire, sending a hail of bullets in your direction.

You die without ever raising a weapon or firing a gun in self-defense.

In your final moments, you get a good look at your assassins: it’s the police.

Brace yourself, because this hair-raising, heart-pounding, jarring account of a no-knock, no-announce SWAT team raid is what passes for court-sanctioned policing in America today, and it could happen to any one of us.

Nationwide, SWAT teams routinely invade homes, break down doors, kill family pets (they always shoot the dogs first), damage furnishings, terrorize families, and wound or kill those unlucky enough to be present during a raid.

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Police Officer Kills Dog for Walking Toward Him With Tail Wagging

For Bradley Brock, his 3-year-old dog, a mastiff named Moose, was his family and his support after a serious motorcycle accident. In a span of seconds on a November night last year, a police officer in Inkster, Michigan, took all of that from Brock when the officer shot Moose multiple times as the dog approached him.

Brock says, and video appears to show, the dog wagging its tail as it trots toward the officer. Brock has now filed a federal civil rights lawsuit arguing that the shooting was an unreasonable seizure under the Fourth Amendment.

The shooting is another alleged instance of an officer misreading dog behavior and slaying a pet—a sadly common occurrence that continues to devastate families, generate public outrage, lead to officers being fired, and cost police departments hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements.

Brock says he called 911 on November 15 of last year after a man at a gas station pulled a gun on him. Video of the incident shows an Inkster police officer talking to Brock while Moose sits on the sidewalk a short distance away, off leash. Moose then trots over to Brock, wagging his tail and stopping to sniff a passing pedestrian, before turning and moving toward the officer.

“He was very friendly, but if anybody was around me, he wanted to check ’em out and make sure they’re okay,” Brock says. “That’s all, like any dog.”

However, the officer begins quickly backpedaling, draws his gun, and within seconds shoots the dog multiple times.

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Cop Walks Past ‘Beware of Dog’ Sign, Tries to Kill Dog, Shoots Fellow Cop Instead

Over the weekend, police were called out to a disturbance report during which they walked past a “Beware of Dog” sign, and encountered a resident’s dog. During the debacle, one of the deputies with the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office did what so many other police officers do when confronted with dogs — he tried to kill it. Instead of killing the dog, however, he shot his fellow deputy.

According to Maj. Frank Stout, the incident unfolded on Sunday around 7 p.m. as police were called out to the alleged “disturbance.” The disturbance was reportedly taking place at the home with the “Beware of Dog” sign and police were warned there were dogs at the residence.

When deputies knocked on the door, they saw two pit bulls inside the home so they backed up off the porch and waited for the homeowner to answer. When the door opened, according to the deputies, a pit bull ran out of the door “aggressively” at them.

“Deputies retreated from the house and porch after they knocked because of the aggressive nature and size of the bulldog,” Stout said. “The door opened and the pit bull aggressively came at the deputies. One deputy was able to divert the charging pit bull and it turned toward another deputy and lunged at him. That deputy fired, striking the bulldog. One of the rounds fired by the deputy ricocheted off the ground and struck the first deputy in the leg.”

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Cop Arrested After Shooting at a ‘Puppy’, Killing Innocent Sleeping Woman Instead

As readers of the Free Thought Project know, police killing or attempting to kill dogs is an all too common occurrence — happening so often that it is caught on video much of the time. Also, as the following tragic case our of Arlington, TX illustrates, all too often, police will attempt to kill a dog — miss the dog — and shoot and kill an innocent person instead.

A Texas grand jury indicted a police officer this week after he was seen on video trying to kill a dog and killing an innocent woman instead.

Arlington police officer Ravi Singh was charged on Wednesday with criminally negligent homicide for killing Maggie Brooks, 30, the daughter of an Arlington fire captain.

“It’s a puppy. This is a grown man afraid of a puppy. Who is the paid professional in this encounter? Every child, every mailman, every runner, jogger, bicyclist has dealt with a dog running at them and no one ends up dead. Why do you go to deadly force immediately?” Brooks’ father, Troy Brooks, said.

Brooks explained to FOX4 that he thought the charges should have been more severe given the ridiculous nature of his daughter’s death.

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‘Death Sentence’: Animal Rights Group Blasts Biden For Allegedly Leaving Contract Dogs Behind In Afghanistan

Animal rights group American Humane has blasted the Biden administration for allegedly leaving U.S. Military contract dogs in Afghanistan, effectively handing down a “death sentence” to the animals.

Dr. Robin R. Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane, released a statement Monday condemning the apparent decision to leave the animals behind.

“I am devastated by reports that the American government is pulling out of Kabul and leaving behind brave U.S. military contract working dogs to be tortured and killed at the hand of our enemies,” Ganzert said. “These brave dogs do the same dangerous, lifesaving work as our military working dogs, and deserved a far better fate than the one to which they have been condemned.”

The CEO said the organization is ready to help these animals escape their fate of death.

“This senseless fate is made all the more tragic, as American Humane stands ready to not only help transport these contract K-9 soldiers to U.S. soil but also to provide for their lifetime medical care,” American Humane said.

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Disturbing Video Shows Cop Walk Up to Family, Shoot Their Happy Puppy as it Wagged His Tail

An utterly disturbing and outright infuriating video was released this week as part of a family’s lawsuit against the now-infamous Loveland police department. In the video, we see the cowardice of officer Matthew Grashorn on display as he shoots a 14-month old puppy in the face and body as it happily walked up to greet him.

The family is now suing after their complaints to the department fell on deaf ears and they were essentially ignored for over two years. The shooting took place on June 29, 2019 and the family has been seeking justice for their mixed boxer puppy “Herkimer” ever since.

On that fateful day, Wendy Love and Jay Hamm were running their firewood delivery company when they pulled over in a vacant parking lot to repair a box they use for the firewood. The owner of the building saw them on security cameras and thought they may be trying to use his dumpster, so he called 911 to have cops investigate.

When police asked the building owner if the family was near or had been near the dumpster, the business owner said, “no,” according to the lawsuit. No crimes had been committed yet the officer responded as if he had arrived to a hostage situation.

“It was an ambush, and Grashorn knew it. He didn’t care,” the suit says. “He suspected that they were poor and wanted to surprise them, to see if they were up to anything he might be able to get an arrest for.”

As Grashorn walked up to the family, he never announced himself but Herkimer, who, according to the suit is a happy dog who had never bitten anyone, trotted up to greet the officer. Unfortunately, however, Grashorn is a coward and instead of petting the dog, Grashorn shot it.

As Wendy approaches the officer crying in horror, Grashorn refuses to let her near her dog to help him.

During this, Hamm yelled at Grashorn, asking him why he had shot a “clearly friendly dog,” according to the suit. Grashorn responded that he had “no way of knowing” whether Herkimer was friendly, that he “wasn’t in the business to get bit” and he had no interest in “waiting to find out” if the dog was friendly.

In other words, he’s a coward who shoots first and asks questions later.

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Siege at Ruby Ridge: The Forgotten History of the ATF Shootout That Started a Militia Movement

The Siege at Ruby Ridge is often considered a pivotal date in American history. The shootout between Randy Weaver and his family and federal agents on August 21, 1992, is one that kicked off the Constitutional Militia Movement and left America with a deep distrust of its leadership – in particular then-President George H.W. Bush and eventual President Bill Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno.

The short version is this: Randy Weaver and his wife Vicki moved with their four kids to the Idaho Panhandle, near the Canadian border, to escape what they thought was an increasingly corrupt world. The Weavers held racial separatist beliefs, but were not involved in any violent activity or rhetoric. They were peaceful Christians who simply wanted to be left alone.

Specifically for his beliefs, Randy Weaver was targeted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) in an entrapping “sting” operation designed to gain his cooperation as a snitch. When he refused to become a federal informant, he was charged with illegally selling firearms. Due to a miscommunication about his court date, the Marshal Service was brought in, who laid siege to his house and shot and killed his wife and 14-year-old son.

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Rescue dogs shot dead in Australia by council due to coronavirus restrictions sparks outrage: ‘Deranged COVID insanity’

A local government in Australia shot and killed rescue dogs because they feared that COVID-19 would spread if people traveled to the shelter to pick them up. The killing of the animals has ignited outrage, and many commenters believe Australia is suffering from coronavirus “hysteria.”

The governing body in the Orana region of New South Wales declared that several rescued dogs at a shelter were a health hazard, so the council had the animals shot to death.

The Bourke Shire Council “killed the dogs to prevent volunteers at a Cobar-based animal shelter from traveling to pick up the animals last week, according to the council’s watchdog,” the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

According to the NSW Health website, there were no recent coronavirus cases in the town of Cobar, but there were fragments of COVID-19 detected in the area’s sewage treatment plant.

A spokesperson for the Office of Local Government, which holds the local government sector in Australia accountable for its actions, said, “OLG has been informed that the council decided to take this course of action to protect its employees and community, including vulnerable Aboriginal populations, from the risk of COVID-19 transmission.”

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