While Trying to Kill an Elderly Toothless Dog, Officer Misses and Shoots His Fellow Cop Instead

Earlier this month, a police officer was hospitalized after he was shot by his partner while responding to a non-criminal call about a suicidal person. The suicidal person was not a threat and the officer was not defending himself from a human when he fired his gun. Instead, when the officers walked up to the man’s home, the neighbor’s bulldog came toward one of them, who opened fire to kill the dog.

But he missed the dog.

“The dog charged at the officers,” Detroit Police Commander Brian Harris told WXYZ. “The officers fearing for their safety, one officer fired one round at the dog. The round didn’t strike the dog, it struck his partner in the lower right calf.”

The point about the dog “charging” the officers is contested, however. In the police report from the incident, a witness told investigators that the dog never once charged and was merely barking at the officers.

“We let the dog out to use the bathroom from the side door,” Tiara, the niece of the dog owner told WXYZ. “The police were walking towards this door, the dog comes up, she’s protecting her area. So she just came out and she barked, she didn’t jump on them, she didn’t lunge and he was just going crazy with the gun. I thought he was gonna shoot me because he was swinging the gun all over the place. I almost had a heart attack because she’s not aggressive, she doesn’t even have teeth, she’s old.”

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While Trying to Kill a Dog, A Cop Missed and Shot His Partner Instead

It is no secret that cops shoot dogs — a lot. Frequent readers of TFTP know too well how many beloved family pets are gunned down every year by public servants in the U.S. It happens so much that there is a term for it called “puppycide.” We have an endless archive of stories in which dogs meet their untimely ends at the end of a cop’s gun.

According to an unofficial count done by an independent research group, Ozymandias Media, a dog is shot by law enforcement every 98 minutes. That number could be higher too as many of the cases never make the media reports.

When these cases do make the local media, often times, they are dismissed by apologists who claim the dogs’ owners were committing crimes or should have had better control of their dog. Unfortunately, however, it is not just people suspected of crimes who see their dogs gunned down in front of them. Cops go onto the wrong properties all the time and kill the dogs of innocent families — and they do so with impunity.

Epitomizing the problem with cops shooting dogs is the fact that even their fellow officers are not safe. According to the Knox County Sheriff’s office, two deputies were responding to a call Tuesday night when a dog came from behind the residence.

Deputy Jordan Hurst then pulled his gun and attempted to kill the dog but instead shot his partner, deputy Lydia Driver.

Driver was taken to the University of Tennessee Medical Center and is recovering from emergency surgery in the ICU. She is expected to recover and according to the sheriff, she is in good spirits.

Hurst has since been placed on paid administrative leave and no details — including the reason for the deputies walking into the yard — have been released. No arrests have been made and no suspects have been named in the response to the reported call.

Instead, the sheriff told the citizens that cops have to make tough decisions and this case is above their comprehension.

“Officers deal with people and situations the average person will never experience in their lifetime. This incident is unfortunate, but we will get through it together. We are blessed to serve a community that loves and appreciates our men and women. For that, I’m grateful,” Sheriff Tom Spangler said.

As this case, and others like it illustrate, it is no secret that police officers are unafraid to put the lives of innocent people in danger and pull their guns out to shoot at dogs. The Free Thought Project has reported on multiple instances in which cops have attempted to shoot dogs and shot men, women, and children instead.

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Deputy Arrested for Torturing Service Dog, Wrapping Him in Duct Tape Before Shooting Him

In the study of psychology, there is a term for those who hurt animals for personal pleasure. It is called intentional animal torture and cruelty and even has its own initialism, IATC. Psychologists have long studied the reasons behind why a person would intentionally harm an animal and the types of people associated with this behavior are often society’s worst. So, when a deputy admits to torturing and then killing a dog, it is likely not the best idea for that person to remain in a position of authority.

Luckily for the taxpayers of Genesee County, they are no longer on the hook for the salary of Genesee County Sheriff’s Office deputy Jacob S. Wilkinson. He was fired this month after admitting to the horrific torture and killing of a service dog.

Normally, when folks find a dead animal, even a dog, on the side of the road, they assume it was likely hit by a vehicle. But when Saginaw County Road Commission employees found this boxer pit bull mix, named ‘Habs’, on the side of the road, they knew instantly that he was not hit by a car.

Habs had been on the roadside for months but was covered in snow. When the snow melted, Habs was found with his mouth duct taped closed and his body wrapped in duct tape to prevent him from moving.

The very idea of duct taping a dog in this fashion is horrifying enough but Wilkinson didn’t stop there. After throwing the completely restrained dog on the side of the road in the snow, Wilkinson put three bullets in Habs’ head and drove off.

Because Habs had been tortured an investigation was launched into his death and when a necropsy — the animal equivalent of an autopsy — was conducted, they found he’d been chipped. Investigators had no idea their investigation would lead back to one of their own — deputy Wilkinson.

Wilkinson worked as a corrections officer for the Michigan Department of Corrections before becoming a deputy with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office. Habs was part of a program with veteran inmates who train dogs to become service animals for veterans — called Blue Star Service Dogs.

“These dogs master basic obedience, command training, and pre-task training and basic tasks such as turning off and on lights, picking up objects, and opening doors,” Blue Star’s website states.

Saginaw County Animal Care & Control Director Bonnie Kanicki told mLive that Habs was in the training program when Wilkinson adopted him.

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Jackboots Policing: No-Knock Raids Rip A Hole In The Fourth Amendment

It’s the middle of the night.

Your neighborhood is in darkness. Your household is asleep.

Suddenly, you’re awakened by a loud noise.

Someone or an army of someones has crashed through your front door.

The intruders are in your home.

Your heart begins racing. Your stomach is tied in knots. The adrenaline is pumping through you.

You’re not just afraid. You’re terrified.

Desperate to protect yourself and your loved ones from whatever threat has invaded your home, you scramble to lay hold of something—anything—that you might use in self-defense. It might be a flashlight, a baseball bat, or that licensed and registered gun you thought you’d never need.

You brace for the confrontation.

Shadowy figures appear at the doorway, screaming orders, threatening violence.

Chaos reigns.

You stand frozen, your hands gripping whatever means of self-defense you could find.

Just that simple act—of standing frozen in fear and self-defense—is enough to spell your doom.

The assailants open fire, sending a hail of bullets in your direction.

You die without ever raising a weapon or firing a gun in self-defense.

In your final moments, you get a good look at your assassins: it’s the police.

Brace yourself, because this hair-raising, heart-pounding, jarring account of a no-knock, no-announce SWAT team raid is what passes for court-sanctioned policing in America today, and it could happen to any one of us.

Nationwide, SWAT teams routinely invade homes, break down doors, kill family pets (they always shoot the dogs first), damage furnishings, terrorize families, and wound or kill those unlucky enough to be present during a raid.

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Police Officer Kills Dog for Walking Toward Him With Tail Wagging

For Bradley Brock, his 3-year-old dog, a mastiff named Moose, was his family and his support after a serious motorcycle accident. In a span of seconds on a November night last year, a police officer in Inkster, Michigan, took all of that from Brock when the officer shot Moose multiple times as the dog approached him.

Brock says, and video appears to show, the dog wagging its tail as it trots toward the officer. Brock has now filed a federal civil rights lawsuit arguing that the shooting was an unreasonable seizure under the Fourth Amendment.

The shooting is another alleged instance of an officer misreading dog behavior and slaying a pet—a sadly common occurrence that continues to devastate families, generate public outrage, lead to officers being fired, and cost police departments hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuit settlements.

Brock says he called 911 on November 15 of last year after a man at a gas station pulled a gun on him. Video of the incident shows an Inkster police officer talking to Brock while Moose sits on the sidewalk a short distance away, off leash. Moose then trots over to Brock, wagging his tail and stopping to sniff a passing pedestrian, before turning and moving toward the officer.

“He was very friendly, but if anybody was around me, he wanted to check ’em out and make sure they’re okay,” Brock says. “That’s all, like any dog.”

However, the officer begins quickly backpedaling, draws his gun, and within seconds shoots the dog multiple times.

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Cop Walks Past ‘Beware of Dog’ Sign, Tries to Kill Dog, Shoots Fellow Cop Instead

Over the weekend, police were called out to a disturbance report during which they walked past a “Beware of Dog” sign, and encountered a resident’s dog. During the debacle, one of the deputies with the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office did what so many other police officers do when confronted with dogs — he tried to kill it. Instead of killing the dog, however, he shot his fellow deputy.

According to Maj. Frank Stout, the incident unfolded on Sunday around 7 p.m. as police were called out to the alleged “disturbance.” The disturbance was reportedly taking place at the home with the “Beware of Dog” sign and police were warned there were dogs at the residence.

When deputies knocked on the door, they saw two pit bulls inside the home so they backed up off the porch and waited for the homeowner to answer. When the door opened, according to the deputies, a pit bull ran out of the door “aggressively” at them.

“Deputies retreated from the house and porch after they knocked because of the aggressive nature and size of the bulldog,” Stout said. “The door opened and the pit bull aggressively came at the deputies. One deputy was able to divert the charging pit bull and it turned toward another deputy and lunged at him. That deputy fired, striking the bulldog. One of the rounds fired by the deputy ricocheted off the ground and struck the first deputy in the leg.”

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Cop Arrested After Shooting at a ‘Puppy’, Killing Innocent Sleeping Woman Instead

As readers of the Free Thought Project know, police killing or attempting to kill dogs is an all too common occurrence — happening so often that it is caught on video much of the time. Also, as the following tragic case our of Arlington, TX illustrates, all too often, police will attempt to kill a dog — miss the dog — and shoot and kill an innocent person instead.

A Texas grand jury indicted a police officer this week after he was seen on video trying to kill a dog and killing an innocent woman instead.

Arlington police officer Ravi Singh was charged on Wednesday with criminally negligent homicide for killing Maggie Brooks, 30, the daughter of an Arlington fire captain.

“It’s a puppy. This is a grown man afraid of a puppy. Who is the paid professional in this encounter? Every child, every mailman, every runner, jogger, bicyclist has dealt with a dog running at them and no one ends up dead. Why do you go to deadly force immediately?” Brooks’ father, Troy Brooks, said.

Brooks explained to FOX4 that he thought the charges should have been more severe given the ridiculous nature of his daughter’s death.

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‘Death Sentence’: Animal Rights Group Blasts Biden For Allegedly Leaving Contract Dogs Behind In Afghanistan

Animal rights group American Humane has blasted the Biden administration for allegedly leaving U.S. Military contract dogs in Afghanistan, effectively handing down a “death sentence” to the animals.

Dr. Robin R. Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane, released a statement Monday condemning the apparent decision to leave the animals behind.

“I am devastated by reports that the American government is pulling out of Kabul and leaving behind brave U.S. military contract working dogs to be tortured and killed at the hand of our enemies,” Ganzert said. “These brave dogs do the same dangerous, lifesaving work as our military working dogs, and deserved a far better fate than the one to which they have been condemned.”

The CEO said the organization is ready to help these animals escape their fate of death.

“This senseless fate is made all the more tragic, as American Humane stands ready to not only help transport these contract K-9 soldiers to U.S. soil but also to provide for their lifetime medical care,” American Humane said.

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