Jon Stewart Goes Full ‘Useful Idiot’ After Dems Sneak $400B Of ‘Mandatory’ Spending Into Veterans’ Health Care Bill

You may have noticed last week that pundit Jon Stewart went on a self-righteous rant about how evil Republicans are because they voted against the PACT Act this week, would have helped veterans affected by burn pits.

Stewart, however, failed to explain why Republicans shot down the bill – which was passed in June with bipartisan support, but was then put up for a re-vote after the House made a change to the tune of $400 billion – shifting it from the ‘discretionary’ spending category to ‘mandatory’ – which Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) said last week was “completely unnecessary to achieve the PACT Act’s stated goal of expanding health care and other benefits for veterans.”

The change would also exempt the $400 billion from annual congressional appropriations – essentially making it a blank check.

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9 Crazy Examples of Waste, Unrelated Pet Projects Snuck into Massive Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill

When President Biden first unveiled his $2+ trillion proposal for an infrastructure spending package, he was widely ridiculed for stretching the meaning of the word “infrastructure” far past its breaking point. The legislation snuck in climate change policy, billions for woke diversity initiatives, massive funding for public schools, and much more under creatively deceptive guises such as “human infrastructure.” Thankfully, this package didn’t get far.

However, more feasible efforts continue from a bipartisan group of senators seeking to pass a $1 trillion infrastructure compromise package. This legislative effort does, in fairness, stay much closer to the traditionally understood definition of infrastructure with its funding for roads, bridges, and more. Yet even this supposedly moderate, reasonable bill is 2,702 pages in length, leaving ample room for lobbyists and individual politicians to slip in wasteful items and crony pet projects.

Here are nine examples of seemingly unrelated, wasteful, or otherwise dubious spending programs snuck into the thousands of pages of legislative text.

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