The night Marilyn Monroe died: What really happened with Kennedy

Just after 3 a.m. on Aug. 5, 1962, mere hours after arguing with her supposed lover — then-U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy — at her Brentwood, Calif., estate., Marilyn Monroe’s nude, lifeless body was reportedly found by her housekeeper. As the story goes, the glamorous star was surrounded by several bottles of sleeping pills and, an hour or so later, the police arrived on the scene.

But some say that’s not quite how it happened.

“No, she wasn’t [dead at home],” says ambulance company owner Walter Schaefer in the new Netflix documentary “The Mystery of Marilyn Monroe: The Unheard Tapes,” out Wednesday.

One of his former drivers, Ken Hunter, had been dispatched to Monroe’s home on the night of her death. Schaefer says that the silver screen superstar was comatose, but alive, when Hunter picked her up and began transporting her to an emergency room in Santa Monica.

And writer John Sherlock claims that Monroe’s last psychiatrist, Dr. Ralph Greenson, told him, years after Monroe’s death, that she was alive at home and was being transported by ambulance to Saint John’s Health Center when she died en route.

“She died in the ambulance,” Sherlock says in the documentary. “Then they took her back to the house. [Greenson] told me he was in the ambulance.”

Monroe’s beautiful and glamorous appeal are indisputable. But, six decades after her tragic passing, the circumstances around her passing remain clouded in contradictions and conspiracies.

“What I learned was information that changed completely what we thought we knew about her mysterious death,” the documentary’s narrator, author Anthony Summers, says in the film. “And suggests that the circumstances of her dying were covered up.”

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Author: HP McLovincraft

Seeker of rabbit holes. Pessimist. Libertine. Contrarian. Your huckleberry. Possibly true tales of sanity-blasting horror also known as abject reality. Prepare yourself. Veteran of a thousand psychic wars. I have seen the fnords. Deplatformed on Tumblr and Twitter.

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