National Museum Of African American History: Valuing ‘Hard Work,’ Being ‘Polite,’ ‘Objectivity’ All ‘Aspects’ Of ‘Whiteness’

Literature from the National Museum of African American History & Culture says concepts like valuing hard word and time, and being polite and objective are all aspects of whiteness or white culture in the United States.

“The National Museum of African American History & Culture wants to make you aware of certain signs of whiteness: Individualism, hard work, objectivity, the nuclear family, progress, respect for authority, delayed gratification, more,” reporter Byron York posted Wednesday.

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The COVID-19 Panic Shows Us Why Science Needs Skeptics

The dumpster fire of COVID predictions has shown exactly why it’s important to sustain and nurture skeptics, lest we blunder into scientific monoculture and groupthink. And yet the explosion of “cancel culture” intolerance of any opinion that doesn’t fit a shrinking “3 x 5 card” of right-think risks destroying the very tolerance and science that sustains our civilization.

Since World War II, America has suffered two respiratory pandemics comparable to COVID-19: the 1958 “Asian flu,” then the 1969 “Hong Kong flu.” In neither case did we shut down the economy—people were simply more carefulNot all that careful, of course—Jimi Hendrix was playing at Woodstock in the middle of the 1969 pandemic, and social distancing wasn’t really a thing in the “Summer of Love.”

And yet COVID-19 was very different thanks to a single “buggy mess” of a computer prediction from one Neil Ferguson, a British epidemiologist given to hysterical overestimates of deaths, from mad cow to bird flu to H1N1.

For COVID-19, Ferguson predicted 3 million deaths in America unless we basically shut down the economy. Panicked policymakers took his prediction as gospel, dressed as it was in the cloak of science.

Now, long after governments plunged half the world into a Great Depression, those panicked revisions are being quietly revised down by an order of magnitude, now suggesting a final tally comparable to 1958 and 1969.

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Ohio County Implements Hotline to Report People Not Wearing Masks

Cuyahoga County — which houses Cleveland, Ohio — has created a hotline so that people can tattle on their neighbors for not wearing masks. Ironically, the county executive claims that they “want people to [wear masks] voluntarily.”

Cuyahoga County has taken Ohio governor Mike DeWine’s mask order to the next level by establishing a hotline that allows people to report others for not wearing what is now considered proper attire in the new era of the Chinese coronavirus, according to a report by Cleveland.com.

The report added that the governor’s mask order will largely rely upon complaints filed by the public, rather than proactive policing.

“This is not intended to be going out and finding people not wearing masks,” insisted Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish in an announcement on Friday. “We want people to wear their masks — we want people to do it voluntarily.”

“There’s not enough people in law enforcement throughout the county to track down people, chase them around and figure out who we can go after for not wearing a mask,” added Budish.

After a complaint is filed, county workers will then contact the person or business to inform them that they have been reported. Complaints will also be forwarded to the Board of Health, as well as the relevant city or village.

The Sheriff’s Department could reportedly investigate or potentially file charges if the violator of the mask order is the subject of repeated complaints.

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33-Year-Old Tech CEO’s Decapitated, Dismembered Remains Found In NYC Apartment Near Electric Saw

The decapitated and dismembered remains of 33-year-old tech CEO Fahim Saleh were found in his Manhattan apartment on Tuesday, according to ABC News (via MSN).

Saleh, co-founder of Bangladeshi ride-share app Pathao – and until this week CEO of Nigerian motorcycle ride-sharing company Gokada – was last seen entering his apartment elevator around 1:40 p.m. followed by a man wearing a suit, gloves, hat and mask, who was carrying a briefcase.

The elevator can be seen arriving on the 7th floor, after which Saleh’s body can be seen falling onto the floor – apparently after being attacked.

Saleh’s body was found Tuesday afternoon by his sister who was concerned after she had not heard from him for a day. She can be seen in surveillance footage entering the building, but the suspected killer is not seen leaving, leading law enforcement to believe she may have interrupted the act of dismembering, police sources said. There is a second way out of the apartment, through a service entrance, according to the sources. -ABC News

Saleh’s head and limbs were detached from his torso and found in several large bags nearby, while investigators also recovered an electric saw which was still plugged into an electrical outlet according to law enforcement sources.

The hitman did not kill Saleh’s dog.

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Philly Mayor’s Ban On Large Events “Does Not Apply” To Protests Or “Demonstrations”

Philadelphia Democratic Mayor James Kenney says his city-wide ban on large events and gatherings through February 2021 does not apply to protests.

“The city’s office of special events will not accept, review, process or approve applications, issue permits or enter into agreements for special events or public gatherings of 50 people or more on public property through the end of February. The moratorium will apply to special events and public gatherings, including but not limited to festivals, parades, concerts, carnivals, fairs and flea markets,” Kenney said during a coronavirus video update on Tuesday.

“In addition, permit applications for residential block permits will not be accepted until further notice. The timeline when such activities may resume will be communicated as soon as possible. To be clear, this hold on large public events does not, does not apply to demonstrations and First Amendment protected activities,” he added.

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Lawsuits Against NYPD Cost Taxpayers $230 Million Last Year

New York City taxpayers are stuck with a $230 million bill for the thousands of lawsuits against the NYPD that the city settled in the last fiscal year, according to a report released this week by Comptroller Scott Stringer.

The annual claims report found that the majority of suits against the department were related to improper police conduct, including excessive force and false arrests. While the number of claims against the NYPD has remained stable—there were 6,472 actions last year, compared to 6,546 in 2017—total payouts have decreased significantly from last year’s high of $335.5 million.

The Comptroller’s report noted that five wrongful conviction suits accounted for $33 million of this past year’s payouts. Four out of five of those claims involved people who spent decades in prison before their sentences were vacated by the late Brooklyn D.A. Ken Thompson’s Conviction Integrity Unit. Their settlements ranged from $1.5 million for Paul Gatling, who was exonerated at the age of 81, to $12.3 million for Andre Hatchett, who spent 25 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

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